AN APPLIED RESEARCH DESIGN USING SINGLE-SUBJECT STRATEGIES TO EVALUATE BEHAVIORAL TREATMENTS FOR ESSENTIAL HYPERTENSION

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282068
Title:
AN APPLIED RESEARCH DESIGN USING SINGLE-SUBJECT STRATEGIES TO EVALUATE BEHAVIORAL TREATMENTS FOR ESSENTIAL HYPERTENSION
Author:
Bissey, Larry Jan
Issue Date:
1981
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This research project utilized single-subject methodology to compare four treatment modalities against each other and a control group (N = 5) in the control of mild essential hypertension. The treatment modalities were non-specific, modified autogenic relaxation, diastolic blood pressure feedback, and a combination of the latter two therapies. Only persons who received the modified autogenic relaxation therapy as a separate treatment were able to decrease their observed mean median diastolic blood pressure by an amount that would be consistently evaluated by physicians as clinically significant. A secondary finding was that, in the case of multiple treatments, a sequence of distinct biofeedback followed by distinct relaxation would be preferred over other possible combinations of the therapies investigated. Suggestions as to further research in the realms of direct, systematic, and clinical N = 1 replications as well as group comparison procedures were offered.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Hypertension.; Hypertension -- Psychological aspects.; Biofeedback training.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Rehabilitation
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Smith, Mae

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAN APPLIED RESEARCH DESIGN USING SINGLE-SUBJECT STRATEGIES TO EVALUATE BEHAVIORAL TREATMENTS FOR ESSENTIAL HYPERTENSIONen_US
dc.creatorBissey, Larry Janen_US
dc.contributor.authorBissey, Larry Janen_US
dc.date.issued1981en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis research project utilized single-subject methodology to compare four treatment modalities against each other and a control group (N = 5) in the control of mild essential hypertension. The treatment modalities were non-specific, modified autogenic relaxation, diastolic blood pressure feedback, and a combination of the latter two therapies. Only persons who received the modified autogenic relaxation therapy as a separate treatment were able to decrease their observed mean median diastolic blood pressure by an amount that would be consistently evaluated by physicians as clinically significant. A secondary finding was that, in the case of multiple treatments, a sequence of distinct biofeedback followed by distinct relaxation would be preferred over other possible combinations of the therapies investigated. Suggestions as to further research in the realms of direct, systematic, and clinical N = 1 replications as well as group comparison procedures were offered.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHypertension.en_US
dc.subjectHypertension -- Psychological aspects.en_US
dc.subjectBiofeedback training.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSmith, Maeen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8207013en_US
dc.identifier.oclc8694351en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b13909496en_US
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