Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282064
Title:
THE PERSISTENCE OF THERAPEUTIC CHANGE
Author:
Schramski, Thomas George
Issue Date:
1981
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The principal purposes of this study were to investigate the persistence of therapeutic change during the posttherapy period and the client variables associated with the persistence of therapeutic change. Secondary attention was given to the analysis of change and associated variables during the actual treatment period. Thirty outpatient, psychotherapy clients were studied and their relative change of status at termination and six-month follow-up was assessed through percent gain and residual change score analysis. Emphasizing the probability of change, the vast majority of clients (97%), using the percent gain analysis, and a substantial minority (30%), using residual change analysis, gained significantly during the treatment period. These differing results were attributed to the "outlier" effect, in which 17% of the clients did not evidence regression toward the mean, and thus made residual change an overly conservative estimate of improvement. Additionally, the low correlation between the residual change scores and the Follow-Up Rating supported this position. A majority (73%) maintained or continued to gain during the posttherapy period, using the residual gain analysis, while a majority (77%) maintained or continued to gain during the posttherapy period, using the percent gain analysis. Socioeconomic status, age, total psychotherapy sessions, initial neuroticism, and initial extroversion were identified as predictors of positive change in status at termination and follow-up. Socioeconomic status, negative life events, marital change, total psychotherapy sessions, initial neuroticism, and age were identified as variables discriminating between positive change and negative change in status groups. A number of limitations for this study were incorporated in implications for future research. These suggestions were designed to assist future researchers and therapists in understanding the persistence of change following psychotherapy.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychotherapy -- Methodology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Counseling and Guidance
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Lauver, Philip

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleTHE PERSISTENCE OF THERAPEUTIC CHANGEen_US
dc.creatorSchramski, Thomas Georgeen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchramski, Thomas Georgeen_US
dc.date.issued1981en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe principal purposes of this study were to investigate the persistence of therapeutic change during the posttherapy period and the client variables associated with the persistence of therapeutic change. Secondary attention was given to the analysis of change and associated variables during the actual treatment period. Thirty outpatient, psychotherapy clients were studied and their relative change of status at termination and six-month follow-up was assessed through percent gain and residual change score analysis. Emphasizing the probability of change, the vast majority of clients (97%), using the percent gain analysis, and a substantial minority (30%), using residual change analysis, gained significantly during the treatment period. These differing results were attributed to the "outlier" effect, in which 17% of the clients did not evidence regression toward the mean, and thus made residual change an overly conservative estimate of improvement. Additionally, the low correlation between the residual change scores and the Follow-Up Rating supported this position. A majority (73%) maintained or continued to gain during the posttherapy period, using the residual gain analysis, while a majority (77%) maintained or continued to gain during the posttherapy period, using the percent gain analysis. Socioeconomic status, age, total psychotherapy sessions, initial neuroticism, and initial extroversion were identified as predictors of positive change in status at termination and follow-up. Socioeconomic status, negative life events, marital change, total psychotherapy sessions, initial neuroticism, and age were identified as variables discriminating between positive change and negative change in status groups. A number of limitations for this study were incorporated in implications for future research. These suggestions were designed to assist future researchers and therapists in understanding the persistence of change following psychotherapy.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychotherapy -- Methodology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCounseling and Guidanceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLauver, Philipen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8206897en_US
dc.identifier.oclc8698113en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b23399892en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.