INSTITUTIONAL ARTICULATION AMONG THREE DIFFERENT EDUCATIONAL LEVELS

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282040
Title:
INSTITUTIONAL ARTICULATION AMONG THREE DIFFERENT EDUCATIONAL LEVELS
Author:
Fuentevilla, Arminda R.
Issue Date:
1981
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study examined the institutional articulation patterns among three different levels of educational institutions: high school, two-year college, and four-year university. The purpose of the study was to determine if there were differences between articulation patterns which affected students in general and articulation patterns which specifically affected Mexican American students to pursue higher education. This study was also concerned with determining whether such articulation patterns were hindering or encouraging the enrollment of Mexican American students at The University of Arizona. The methodologial approach of the study was a descriptive research design and included the use of questionnaires and interviews. The sampling methodology used was double stratified random sampling which took into account: (1) three participating educational institutions and (2) sampling a portion of the personnel at the three institutions and students at the four-year university. The sample consisted of: (1) 45 randomly selected personnel involved in articulation activities in three educational areas (administrative, curricular, and student services) at three different institutional levels: senior high school district, community college, and four-year university, and (2) 15 randomly selected first-year students at the four-year university. An open-ended questionnaire was developed for the personnel sample. The articulation practices identified from this questionnaire were classified into specific categories for the purpose of developing a second questionnaire for interviewing the student respondents. Descriptive data were collected, presented, and discussed. Tabulation of percentages and frequencies were studied, interpreted, and presented in 20 tables and six figures. There were 455 articulation activities identified. These were classified into 25 different articulation categories. Two different articulation systems were reported: one directed to all students and another for Mexican American students. The findings strongly suggest that insufficient articulation efforts are in existence. Curricular personnel were found to be doing the least articulating efforts to help all students and specifically Mexican American students. Based on the results of this study, various recommendations were made. There is a need for better interinstitutional planning to provide continuum that will allow more access to post-secondary education for Mexican American students.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Articulation (Education); Mexican Americans -- Education (Higher) -- Arizona.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Educational Foundations and Administration
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Flores, Ernesto Y.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleINSTITUTIONAL ARTICULATION AMONG THREE DIFFERENT EDUCATIONAL LEVELSen_US
dc.creatorFuentevilla, Arminda R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFuentevilla, Arminda R.en_US
dc.date.issued1981en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the institutional articulation patterns among three different levels of educational institutions: high school, two-year college, and four-year university. The purpose of the study was to determine if there were differences between articulation patterns which affected students in general and articulation patterns which specifically affected Mexican American students to pursue higher education. This study was also concerned with determining whether such articulation patterns were hindering or encouraging the enrollment of Mexican American students at The University of Arizona. The methodologial approach of the study was a descriptive research design and included the use of questionnaires and interviews. The sampling methodology used was double stratified random sampling which took into account: (1) three participating educational institutions and (2) sampling a portion of the personnel at the three institutions and students at the four-year university. The sample consisted of: (1) 45 randomly selected personnel involved in articulation activities in three educational areas (administrative, curricular, and student services) at three different institutional levels: senior high school district, community college, and four-year university, and (2) 15 randomly selected first-year students at the four-year university. An open-ended questionnaire was developed for the personnel sample. The articulation practices identified from this questionnaire were classified into specific categories for the purpose of developing a second questionnaire for interviewing the student respondents. Descriptive data were collected, presented, and discussed. Tabulation of percentages and frequencies were studied, interpreted, and presented in 20 tables and six figures. There were 455 articulation activities identified. These were classified into 25 different articulation categories. Two different articulation systems were reported: one directed to all students and another for Mexican American students. The findings strongly suggest that insufficient articulation efforts are in existence. Curricular personnel were found to be doing the least articulating efforts to help all students and specifically Mexican American students. Based on the results of this study, various recommendations were made. There is a need for better interinstitutional planning to provide continuum that will allow more access to post-secondary education for Mexican American students.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectArticulation (Education)en_US
dc.subjectMexican Americans -- Education (Higher) -- Arizona.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Foundations and Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFlores, Ernesto Y.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8202546en_US
dc.identifier.oclc8250542en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b13732730en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.