Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282025
Title:
THE STABLE CHANNEL AS SHAPED TO FLOW AND SEDIMENT
Author:
Silverston, Elliot, 1951-
Issue Date:
1981
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Stable channel design is a very important element in many water resources projects. Both bed and bank stability are necessary design criteria. The channel is designed for some critical flow rate and sediment load, where the bank erodibility, sediment size distribution, and channel resistance to flow are imposed conditions. For these conditions the stable channel width, depth, and slope are predicted. Earlier studies by Lacey, Blench, and others related the channel dimensions to the flow rate as a power function. In Blench's study the coefficient of the function was dependent on the nature and charge of the bed material, and the erodibility of the sides, while the exponent was a constant. This study extends the power function equation relationship. The width, depth, and width/depth ratio were considered functions of the flow rate, and the coefficients and exponents were both found to be dependent on the sediment concentration and the bank erodibility. The tractive force method was used in this analysis. A set of design graphs were determined from simultaneous solutions of the Manning and Laursen equations. From the graphs design equations were formulated. Some simple example problems were solved using this method. In the analysis the bank erodibility (maximum permissible bank shear) needed to be quantified. Experiments were performed with a Preston tube to determine the shear distributions in channels with various roughness patterns. From the results the maximum bank shear could be determined as a coefficient times the maximum bed shear. When the smooth channel and rough channel were tested, the results compared well with the values used by Lane (coefficient approximately 0.76). When the banks were smooth and the bed was rough, or vice versa, the coefficient was found to be different than 0.76. More testing is considered necessary to determine if the difference is significant.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Stream channelization -- Mathematical models.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Civil Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Laursen, Emmett M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleTHE STABLE CHANNEL AS SHAPED TO FLOW AND SEDIMENTen_US
dc.creatorSilverston, Elliot, 1951-en_US
dc.contributor.authorSilverston, Elliot, 1951-en_US
dc.date.issued1981en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractStable channel design is a very important element in many water resources projects. Both bed and bank stability are necessary design criteria. The channel is designed for some critical flow rate and sediment load, where the bank erodibility, sediment size distribution, and channel resistance to flow are imposed conditions. For these conditions the stable channel width, depth, and slope are predicted. Earlier studies by Lacey, Blench, and others related the channel dimensions to the flow rate as a power function. In Blench's study the coefficient of the function was dependent on the nature and charge of the bed material, and the erodibility of the sides, while the exponent was a constant. This study extends the power function equation relationship. The width, depth, and width/depth ratio were considered functions of the flow rate, and the coefficients and exponents were both found to be dependent on the sediment concentration and the bank erodibility. The tractive force method was used in this analysis. A set of design graphs were determined from simultaneous solutions of the Manning and Laursen equations. From the graphs design equations were formulated. Some simple example problems were solved using this method. In the analysis the bank erodibility (maximum permissible bank shear) needed to be quantified. Experiments were performed with a Preston tube to determine the shear distributions in channels with various roughness patterns. From the results the maximum bank shear could be determined as a coefficient times the maximum bed shear. When the smooth channel and rough channel were tested, the results compared well with the values used by Lane (coefficient approximately 0.76). When the banks were smooth and the bed was rough, or vice versa, the coefficient was found to be different than 0.76. More testing is considered necessary to determine if the difference is significant.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectStream channelization -- Mathematical models.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLaursen, Emmett M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8200325en_US
dc.identifier.oclc8717333en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b13919611en_US
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