THE INCREMENTAL INFORMATION CONTENT OF THE ANNUAL REPORT TO SHAREHOLDERS AND THE TEN-K

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282017
Title:
THE INCREMENTAL INFORMATION CONTENT OF THE ANNUAL REPORT TO SHAREHOLDERS AND THE TEN-K
Author:
Jenkins, David Randall
Issue Date:
1981
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The objective of this study is to evaluate the incremental information content of the Annual Report to Shareholders (ARS) and the 10-K. The study defines incremental information content as that set of data that has not been previously released to the public, which is contained in the ARS or 10-K, that gives rise to a resetting of equilibrium security prices. The results of the study have two implications. First, a finding of the existence of incremental information content in either the ARS or the 10-K provides evidence that investors may use the incremental data contained in either report to improve their estimates of firms' systematic risk components (Beta). Second, the results of the study may provide feedback value to accounting policymakers for evaluating their prior beliefs concerning the wealth effects of their accounting policy decisions. The study employs the familiar Market Model for generating unexpected returns. Further, the ordinary least squares regression method is used to derive regression parameters (including Beta) for the Market Model. This procedure has been accomplished for the 312 ARS and 159 10-K sample firms for reporting years ending in 1975, 1976 and 1977. The Quandt log-likelihood ratio and the Chow test have been employed to block the two study samples on the basis of stable regression parameters and to determine which weeks in the study period Beta-shifts have occurred for firms in the Non-Stationary ARS and 10-K groups. Two procedures have been employed in the study. The first procedure has been employed to determine if an unusual concentration of Beta-shifts has occurred in conjunction with the release of either report. The second procedure has been employed to detect the existence of any unusual unexpected return activity associated with the release of the ARS or the 10-K. Using the procedures described above, the study concludes that neither the release of the ARS nor the release of the 10-K affects investors' assessments of firms' systematic risk components or return distributions. Thus, the evidence the dissertation provides does not support an hypothesis that either report possesses incremental information content. Finally, the study concludes that the ARS and the 10-K fail to influence investors assessments and that policymakers must rely on their value judgments concerning their prior beliefs for the wealth effects of the ARS and 10-K.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Corporation reports.; Corporations -- Accounting.; Disclosure in accounting.; Disclosure of information.; Investment analysis.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Business Administration
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Vickrey, Don W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleTHE INCREMENTAL INFORMATION CONTENT OF THE ANNUAL REPORT TO SHAREHOLDERS AND THE TEN-Ken_US
dc.creatorJenkins, David Randallen_US
dc.contributor.authorJenkins, David Randallen_US
dc.date.issued1981en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe objective of this study is to evaluate the incremental information content of the Annual Report to Shareholders (ARS) and the 10-K. The study defines incremental information content as that set of data that has not been previously released to the public, which is contained in the ARS or 10-K, that gives rise to a resetting of equilibrium security prices. The results of the study have two implications. First, a finding of the existence of incremental information content in either the ARS or the 10-K provides evidence that investors may use the incremental data contained in either report to improve their estimates of firms' systematic risk components (Beta). Second, the results of the study may provide feedback value to accounting policymakers for evaluating their prior beliefs concerning the wealth effects of their accounting policy decisions. The study employs the familiar Market Model for generating unexpected returns. Further, the ordinary least squares regression method is used to derive regression parameters (including Beta) for the Market Model. This procedure has been accomplished for the 312 ARS and 159 10-K sample firms for reporting years ending in 1975, 1976 and 1977. The Quandt log-likelihood ratio and the Chow test have been employed to block the two study samples on the basis of stable regression parameters and to determine which weeks in the study period Beta-shifts have occurred for firms in the Non-Stationary ARS and 10-K groups. Two procedures have been employed in the study. The first procedure has been employed to determine if an unusual concentration of Beta-shifts has occurred in conjunction with the release of either report. The second procedure has been employed to detect the existence of any unusual unexpected return activity associated with the release of the ARS or the 10-K. Using the procedures described above, the study concludes that neither the release of the ARS nor the release of the 10-K affects investors' assessments of firms' systematic risk components or return distributions. Thus, the evidence the dissertation provides does not support an hypothesis that either report possesses incremental information content. Finally, the study concludes that the ARS and the 10-K fail to influence investors assessments and that policymakers must rely on their value judgments concerning their prior beliefs for the wealth effects of the ARS and 10-K.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectCorporation reports.en_US
dc.subjectCorporations -- Accounting.en_US
dc.subjectDisclosure in accounting.en_US
dc.subjectDisclosure of information.en_US
dc.subjectInvestment analysis.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBusiness Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorVickrey, Don W.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8128332en_US
dc.identifier.oclc8067600en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b23475092en_US
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