ASSESSMENT OF A COLLEGE WRESTLING TEAM ORGANIZED UNDER A THEORY OF PERSONAL PROCESSES

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282015
Title:
ASSESSMENT OF A COLLEGE WRESTLING TEAM ORGANIZED UNDER A THEORY OF PERSONAL PROCESSES
Author:
Noble, Eli Sidney
Issue Date:
1981
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study was concerned with the perceptions of the members of a college wrestling team which was oganized and operated according to a theory of personal processes. The setting of the study is Pima Community College, Tucson, Arizona. A personal processes theory was derived from the literature of democratic processes as one of two frames of reference. This frame of reference was used to organize the dissertation, develop the questionnaire, and present the data. It included the following categories: (1) contact; (2) consult; (3) find; (4) share; and (5) accompany. A perceptual psychology theory was also derived from the literature as the second frame of reference. This frame of reference was used for the purpose of analyzing the data. It included the following categories: (1) perceptual field; (2) perceptions; (3) needs; (4) self-perceptions; and (5) behavior. Each category of the personal processes theory was organized and presented as follows: (1) a statement concerning the category under examination; (2) certain category related questionnaire statements displaying composite quantitative findings; (3) representative respondents' comments to each questionnaire statement; and (4) an examination of respondents' comments employing the perceptual framework. According to the theory of personal processes used in this investigation: (1) contact is the very beginning of person-to-person relationships; (2) consult is the next step in contact. It constitutes the efforts of one person to learn about another through dialogue; (3) find is the possible outcome of contact and consult. It suggests the discovery of some of the other person's needs, interests, concerns, aspirations, etc.; (4) share is the culmination of the contact, consult, and find categories. It constitutes that stage of the process where the involved persons exchange ideas regarding the identified needs, interests, concerns, aspirations, etc.; and (5) accompany is the final action phase of the process. In this stage, the involved persons actually do things together in pursuing the identified interests of the person. The theory of personal processes utilized by the wrestling coaches at Pima Community College was found to be highly regarded by most of the respondents. Although certain respondents commented that they were at first reluctant to accept this approach, the majority of the team members had little or no difficulties in adjusting to it. They felt that it served their needs, interests, and feelings more nearly than their previous wrestling experiences. The respondents commented that they perceived the opportunity to participate in the decision-making process and the warm, friendly, and supportive atmosphere created by the coaches as major factors in their respective decisions to attend Pima Community College and wrestle. For the wrestling coach who desires to employ an alternative to the coach-centered, traditional approach to coaching, the use of the theory of personal processes is recommended. It is immediately applicable to the following concerns of wrestling team members and their coaches: (1) recruiting; (2) financial aid; (3) housing; (4) enrolling in school; and (5) the acquisition of wrestling skills.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Wrestling -- Coaching.; Interpersonal relations.
Degree Name:
Educat.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Barnes, William D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleASSESSMENT OF A COLLEGE WRESTLING TEAM ORGANIZED UNDER A THEORY OF PERSONAL PROCESSESen_US
dc.creatorNoble, Eli Sidneyen_US
dc.contributor.authorNoble, Eli Sidneyen_US
dc.date.issued1981en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study was concerned with the perceptions of the members of a college wrestling team which was oganized and operated according to a theory of personal processes. The setting of the study is Pima Community College, Tucson, Arizona. A personal processes theory was derived from the literature of democratic processes as one of two frames of reference. This frame of reference was used to organize the dissertation, develop the questionnaire, and present the data. It included the following categories: (1) contact; (2) consult; (3) find; (4) share; and (5) accompany. A perceptual psychology theory was also derived from the literature as the second frame of reference. This frame of reference was used for the purpose of analyzing the data. It included the following categories: (1) perceptual field; (2) perceptions; (3) needs; (4) self-perceptions; and (5) behavior. Each category of the personal processes theory was organized and presented as follows: (1) a statement concerning the category under examination; (2) certain category related questionnaire statements displaying composite quantitative findings; (3) representative respondents' comments to each questionnaire statement; and (4) an examination of respondents' comments employing the perceptual framework. According to the theory of personal processes used in this investigation: (1) contact is the very beginning of person-to-person relationships; (2) consult is the next step in contact. It constitutes the efforts of one person to learn about another through dialogue; (3) find is the possible outcome of contact and consult. It suggests the discovery of some of the other person's needs, interests, concerns, aspirations, etc.; (4) share is the culmination of the contact, consult, and find categories. It constitutes that stage of the process where the involved persons exchange ideas regarding the identified needs, interests, concerns, aspirations, etc.; and (5) accompany is the final action phase of the process. In this stage, the involved persons actually do things together in pursuing the identified interests of the person. The theory of personal processes utilized by the wrestling coaches at Pima Community College was found to be highly regarded by most of the respondents. Although certain respondents commented that they were at first reluctant to accept this approach, the majority of the team members had little or no difficulties in adjusting to it. They felt that it served their needs, interests, and feelings more nearly than their previous wrestling experiences. The respondents commented that they perceived the opportunity to participate in the decision-making process and the warm, friendly, and supportive atmosphere created by the coaches as major factors in their respective decisions to attend Pima Community College and wrestle. For the wrestling coach who desires to employ an alternative to the coach-centered, traditional approach to coaching, the use of the theory of personal processes is recommended. It is immediately applicable to the following concerns of wrestling team members and their coaches: (1) recruiting; (2) financial aid; (3) housing; (4) enrolling in school; and (5) the acquisition of wrestling skills.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectWrestling -- Coaching.en_US
dc.subjectInterpersonal relations.en_US
thesis.degree.nameEducat.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBarnes, William D.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8128330en_US
dc.identifier.oclc8700310en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b13911053en_US
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