Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282005
Title:
A THEORY-BASED CURRICULUM IN PERSONHOOD DEVELOPMENT
Author:
Emrick, Angela Marie
Issue Date:
1980
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A theory-based curriculum on Personhood Development provides an organized system through which a self-actualizing program can be initiated and effectively expanded by any individual in society, whatever his age or position. From this point of view, therefore, the curriculum itself transcends the formal educational experience, becoming a pervasive lifetime study. Its concepts and principles are based on solid research to which some of the finest experts in psychology have contributed. Because of current problems and needs in society and because of rapidly enlarging bodies of knowledge, new vision and reorganization of educational premises seem logical and pertinent requirements for people moving into another century. Education is, by its very nature, an integrative process. Such integration involves the entire person: his internal elements and his avenues of change, his perceptions and perspectives of life, his directive efforts towards the future, his expectations of what this future should be. The curriculum design rises out of a specific philosophy, no part of which is vague or unsupported by authoritative writings. From that philosophy, four generational objectives flow, three of which provide learning experiences and the last of which provides an environment to secure such provisions. The generational objectives have specific behavioral goals attached, definite and active goals which are within the reach of all. It is from this pyramidal construct that the lessons are formulated, the methods are selected, the student production is outlined, and the applications to the allied curricula are viewed. Suggested evaluative procedures necessitate longitudinal studies for this program in the future. An organized system of encounters avails the facilitator with the process and methods for guiding his clients through the program. The encounters, fifteen in number, furnish a structure which allows the plan to proceed in a defined and logical pattern. From the initial discussions which have to do with the acceptance of self and with the study of one's internal elements, the clients diagnose their present status. This status is delineated via written and/or oral articulation of perceptions and perspectives the students have of themselves. Their present status in the avenues of modification -- those channels by which the human being experiences change -- are considered immediately after the internal elements are diagnosed. Thus, these avenues also are examined with a view towards developing positive activities in order to realize the full potential of the individual. Following hard on the heels of the basic diagnoses, the personal plan for future growth is then designed. In order to determine the possibilities for realistic growth, the student examines his strengths, discovers his aptitudes and talents, seeks information and supportive direction, cultivates desirable habits, and lessens or eradicates those habits detrimental to his personhood. Appendices furnish copies of those materials utilized with the program. Copies of pages for student use are presented as well as sample lessons, miscellaneous presentations in allied curricula, and examples of exercises used with faculty members and with parent groups. For those who wish to exercise this technique a regular program, uncomplicated and cyclic, is now available. Several studies for the future, enlarging on the basic work, can be forthcoming. It is recommended that such explorations be continued and that valid creative work be encouraged in order to realize ever more fully the potential inherent in every individual.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Humanistic.; Education -- Curricula.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Secondary Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Allen, Paul

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleA THEORY-BASED CURRICULUM IN PERSONHOOD DEVELOPMENTen_US
dc.creatorEmrick, Angela Marieen_US
dc.contributor.authorEmrick, Angela Marieen_US
dc.date.issued1980en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA theory-based curriculum on Personhood Development provides an organized system through which a self-actualizing program can be initiated and effectively expanded by any individual in society, whatever his age or position. From this point of view, therefore, the curriculum itself transcends the formal educational experience, becoming a pervasive lifetime study. Its concepts and principles are based on solid research to which some of the finest experts in psychology have contributed. Because of current problems and needs in society and because of rapidly enlarging bodies of knowledge, new vision and reorganization of educational premises seem logical and pertinent requirements for people moving into another century. Education is, by its very nature, an integrative process. Such integration involves the entire person: his internal elements and his avenues of change, his perceptions and perspectives of life, his directive efforts towards the future, his expectations of what this future should be. The curriculum design rises out of a specific philosophy, no part of which is vague or unsupported by authoritative writings. From that philosophy, four generational objectives flow, three of which provide learning experiences and the last of which provides an environment to secure such provisions. The generational objectives have specific behavioral goals attached, definite and active goals which are within the reach of all. It is from this pyramidal construct that the lessons are formulated, the methods are selected, the student production is outlined, and the applications to the allied curricula are viewed. Suggested evaluative procedures necessitate longitudinal studies for this program in the future. An organized system of encounters avails the facilitator with the process and methods for guiding his clients through the program. The encounters, fifteen in number, furnish a structure which allows the plan to proceed in a defined and logical pattern. From the initial discussions which have to do with the acceptance of self and with the study of one's internal elements, the clients diagnose their present status. This status is delineated via written and/or oral articulation of perceptions and perspectives the students have of themselves. Their present status in the avenues of modification -- those channels by which the human being experiences change -- are considered immediately after the internal elements are diagnosed. Thus, these avenues also are examined with a view towards developing positive activities in order to realize the full potential of the individual. Following hard on the heels of the basic diagnoses, the personal plan for future growth is then designed. In order to determine the possibilities for realistic growth, the student examines his strengths, discovers his aptitudes and talents, seeks information and supportive direction, cultivates desirable habits, and lessens or eradicates those habits detrimental to his personhood. Appendices furnish copies of those materials utilized with the program. Copies of pages for student use are presented as well as sample lessons, miscellaneous presentations in allied curricula, and examples of exercises used with faculty members and with parent groups. For those who wish to exercise this technique a regular program, uncomplicated and cyclic, is now available. Several studies for the future, enlarging on the basic work, can be forthcoming. It is recommended that such explorations be continued and that valid creative work be encouraged in order to realize ever more fully the potential inherent in every individual.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Humanistic.en_US
dc.subjectEducation -- Curricula.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSecondary Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorAllen, Paulen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8017773en_US
dc.identifier.oclc7427541en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b13382792en_US
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