THE READING STRATEGIES OF SELECTED JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS IN THE CONTENT AREAS

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/281977
Title:
THE READING STRATEGIES OF SELECTED JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS IN THE CONTENT AREAS
Author:
Coles, Richard Earle
Issue Date:
1981
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study investigates the reading strategies selected junior high school students employ when reading social studies, science, and literature materials in school and a self-selected passage in a non-school setting. In addition interrelationships among their reading strategies and the subjects' purposes for reading, the students' personal models of the reading process, and the readers' attitudes toward reading, as well as the subject areas of social studies, science, and English are also examined. Six subjects from a seventh grade class are administered the Estes Attitude Scales, the Burke Reading Interview, and are questioned concerning their purposes for reading the selected passages. Miscue analysis identifies the reading strategies these subjects employ in their natural environments. Retrospective responses are examined to investigate the subjects' awareness of their reading strategies. The major findings indicate that each of these subjects sample syntactic, semantic, and graphophonic cues when reading. The more efficient readers produce more sentences which are syntactically and semantically acceptable, and result in no change to the intended meaning. The subjects' patterns of self-correction vary depending on the different materials. The students' sampling of graphophonic cues appears not to reflect reader proficiency but varies with different curricular materials. The retelling scores are not always predictable based on the readability formula ratings for the same passage. Other measures do not relate simply to proficiency of reading. These findings indicate a complex interaction between the subjects' reading strategies and their attitudes toward reading or a specific discipline, reading in different settings, the selection of reading materials, and reading for different purposes. The findings support a conclusion that these junior high school students employ recognition, prediction, confirmation, correction, and termination reading strategies when reading for diverse purposes teacher assigned, and self-selected materials in different settings. The subjects vary in their ability to adjust their reading strategies to meet the specific demands of different curricular materials. The subjects have differing perceptions of reading in different settings and among various materials. Students and teachers have different purposes for reading the same passages. The students do not seem to be having as much difficulty reading in terms of using the process as much as they have with flexible use of the process in relation to different materials and settings.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Reading.; Reading, Psychology of.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Elementary Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Goodman, Yetta M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleTHE READING STRATEGIES OF SELECTED JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS IN THE CONTENT AREASen_US
dc.creatorColes, Richard Earleen_US
dc.contributor.authorColes, Richard Earleen_US
dc.date.issued1981en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study investigates the reading strategies selected junior high school students employ when reading social studies, science, and literature materials in school and a self-selected passage in a non-school setting. In addition interrelationships among their reading strategies and the subjects' purposes for reading, the students' personal models of the reading process, and the readers' attitudes toward reading, as well as the subject areas of social studies, science, and English are also examined. Six subjects from a seventh grade class are administered the Estes Attitude Scales, the Burke Reading Interview, and are questioned concerning their purposes for reading the selected passages. Miscue analysis identifies the reading strategies these subjects employ in their natural environments. Retrospective responses are examined to investigate the subjects' awareness of their reading strategies. The major findings indicate that each of these subjects sample syntactic, semantic, and graphophonic cues when reading. The more efficient readers produce more sentences which are syntactically and semantically acceptable, and result in no change to the intended meaning. The subjects' patterns of self-correction vary depending on the different materials. The students' sampling of graphophonic cues appears not to reflect reader proficiency but varies with different curricular materials. The retelling scores are not always predictable based on the readability formula ratings for the same passage. Other measures do not relate simply to proficiency of reading. These findings indicate a complex interaction between the subjects' reading strategies and their attitudes toward reading or a specific discipline, reading in different settings, the selection of reading materials, and reading for different purposes. The findings support a conclusion that these junior high school students employ recognition, prediction, confirmation, correction, and termination reading strategies when reading for diverse purposes teacher assigned, and self-selected materials in different settings. The subjects vary in their ability to adjust their reading strategies to meet the specific demands of different curricular materials. The subjects have differing perceptions of reading in different settings and among various materials. Students and teachers have different purposes for reading the same passages. The students do not seem to be having as much difficulty reading in terms of using the process as much as they have with flexible use of the process in relation to different materials and settings.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectReading.en_US
dc.subjectReading, Psychology of.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineElementary Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGoodman, Yetta M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8118454en_US
dc.identifier.oclc8258492en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b23484147en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.