NUTRITIONAL AND BEHAVIORAL COMPONENTS OF REPRODUCTION IN THE BLUE SHRIMP PENAEUS STYLIROSTRIS REARED UNDER CONTROLLED ENVIRONMENT CONDITIONS

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/281976
Title:
NUTRITIONAL AND BEHAVIORAL COMPONENTS OF REPRODUCTION IN THE BLUE SHRIMP PENAEUS STYLIROSTRIS REARED UNDER CONTROLLED ENVIRONMENT CONDITIONS
Author:
Magarelli, Paul Charles
Issue Date:
1981
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Sex-specific nutritional requirements for crude protein and fat were demonstrated in cultured (F1) Penaeus stylirostris brood stock. Female shrimp required diets which had higher protein (32 versus 27%), lower fat (2.5 versus 3.9%), higher protein/calorie ratios (8.5 versus 6.8% protein/kcal/g), and much higher protein/fat ratios (15.4 versus 7.8% protein/% fat) than males. These studies have also demonstrated a nutritional demand corresponding to the onset of ovarian maturation, a phenomenon which was explained as a reduction in growth rates at the attainment of 30 to 35 g in shrimp fed deficient diets. Both the quality and the quantity of dietary fat were shown to affect the growth of P. stylirostris brood stock. Male growth was positively correlated with the quantity of eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5 ω3) in the diets. The females were not affected by the types of fatty acids in the fat; they were influenced more by the quantity of fat, i.e., as the fat level of the diet increased, the growth decreased. Cold extrusion feed (CEF) diets supplemented with squid, and diets which included squid as one of the ingredients in the formulation, were found to stimulate better growth in both male and female brood stock as compared to CEF diets of equal protein and fat content without squid. The protein/fat ratio, as well as the content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), were suggested to be responsible for the improved growth. Comparisons were made between the quality of spawns from wild P. stylirostris matured in captivity (P1) and F1 shrimp. Protein levels of the eggs did not correlate with either the number of eggs spawned or the eclosion rate. The number of the eggs spawned was correlated positively with the levels of eicosaenoic acid (20:1 ω9) in both P1 and F1 eggs, and correlated negatively with linoleic acid (18:2 ω6) in P1 eggs only. Spawning times were reported to occur later in the evening as summer approached. A significant, negative correlation was observed between the elapsed time from copulation, i.e., collection of fertilized shrimp, to spawning and eclosion rate. Also, a significant positive correlation was observed between the number of spawns which contained eggs which did not hatch, and the elapsed time from copulation to spawning. The number of eggs spawned and the eclosion rate were found to be higher in P1 shrimp as compared to F1 shrimp. Also, first breeding season spawners (FBS) had better quality spawns than second breeding season (SBS) spawners, i.e., more eggs with higher eclosion rates. A general reduction in the quality of the spawns was therefore implicated as a result of the culture conditions. Multiple spawning behavior was observed and there appeared to be no qualitative or quantitative difference between spawns. Tank size and shape were demonstrated to affect the onset of ovarian development and the transfer of the spermatophore. A minimum of three meters was thought to be required for the development of the ovaries and the successful transfer of the spermatophore.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Blue shrimp.; Shrimps -- Behavior.; Shrimps -- Nutrition.; Shrimps -- Reproduction.; Penaeus.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Agricultural Biochemistry and Nutrition
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Colvin, L. Benard

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleNUTRITIONAL AND BEHAVIORAL COMPONENTS OF REPRODUCTION IN THE BLUE SHRIMP PENAEUS STYLIROSTRIS REARED UNDER CONTROLLED ENVIRONMENT CONDITIONSen_US
dc.creatorMagarelli, Paul Charlesen_US
dc.contributor.authorMagarelli, Paul Charlesen_US
dc.date.issued1981en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSex-specific nutritional requirements for crude protein and fat were demonstrated in cultured (F1) Penaeus stylirostris brood stock. Female shrimp required diets which had higher protein (32 versus 27%), lower fat (2.5 versus 3.9%), higher protein/calorie ratios (8.5 versus 6.8% protein/kcal/g), and much higher protein/fat ratios (15.4 versus 7.8% protein/% fat) than males. These studies have also demonstrated a nutritional demand corresponding to the onset of ovarian maturation, a phenomenon which was explained as a reduction in growth rates at the attainment of 30 to 35 g in shrimp fed deficient diets. Both the quality and the quantity of dietary fat were shown to affect the growth of P. stylirostris brood stock. Male growth was positively correlated with the quantity of eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5 ω3) in the diets. The females were not affected by the types of fatty acids in the fat; they were influenced more by the quantity of fat, i.e., as the fat level of the diet increased, the growth decreased. Cold extrusion feed (CEF) diets supplemented with squid, and diets which included squid as one of the ingredients in the formulation, were found to stimulate better growth in both male and female brood stock as compared to CEF diets of equal protein and fat content without squid. The protein/fat ratio, as well as the content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), were suggested to be responsible for the improved growth. Comparisons were made between the quality of spawns from wild P. stylirostris matured in captivity (P1) and F1 shrimp. Protein levels of the eggs did not correlate with either the number of eggs spawned or the eclosion rate. The number of the eggs spawned was correlated positively with the levels of eicosaenoic acid (20:1 ω9) in both P1 and F1 eggs, and correlated negatively with linoleic acid (18:2 ω6) in P1 eggs only. Spawning times were reported to occur later in the evening as summer approached. A significant, negative correlation was observed between the elapsed time from copulation, i.e., collection of fertilized shrimp, to spawning and eclosion rate. Also, a significant positive correlation was observed between the number of spawns which contained eggs which did not hatch, and the elapsed time from copulation to spawning. The number of eggs spawned and the eclosion rate were found to be higher in P1 shrimp as compared to F1 shrimp. Also, first breeding season spawners (FBS) had better quality spawns than second breeding season (SBS) spawners, i.e., more eggs with higher eclosion rates. A general reduction in the quality of the spawns was therefore implicated as a result of the culture conditions. Multiple spawning behavior was observed and there appeared to be no qualitative or quantitative difference between spawns. Tank size and shape were demonstrated to affect the onset of ovarian development and the transfer of the spermatophore. A minimum of three meters was thought to be required for the development of the ovaries and the successful transfer of the spermatophore.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBlue shrimp.en_US
dc.subjectShrimps -- Behavior.en_US
dc.subjectShrimps -- Nutrition.en_US
dc.subjectShrimps -- Reproduction.en_US
dc.subjectPenaeus.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural Biochemistry and Nutritionen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorColvin, L. Benarden_US
dc.identifier.proquest8118453en_US
dc.identifier.oclc8712812en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b13918321en_US
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