THE EFFECTS OF SUPPORT SERVICES ON THE SELF CONCEPT, LOCUS OF CONTROL AND GOAL ATTAINMENT OF PHYSICALLY DISABLED COLLEGE STUDENTS

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/281970
Title:
THE EFFECTS OF SUPPORT SERVICES ON THE SELF CONCEPT, LOCUS OF CONTROL AND GOAL ATTAINMENT OF PHYSICALLY DISABLED COLLEGE STUDENTS
Author:
Lesh, Kay Christensen
Issue Date:
1981
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
College is a time of pressure and stress for students. The presence of a physical disability can be a factor which lends additional complications and adds to the stress and adjustment difficulties in the college years. In recognition of the stresses and pressures and in response to legislative mandates, colleges are beginning to offer programs of support services for physically disabled students. Although the literature supports such offerings as helpful in the adjustment process, little research has been done to determine effectiveness of support services. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of two types of support services, Adaptive Physical Education and Group Counseling on the adjustment of physically disabled students as measured by pre and post treatment mean scores on the Tennessee Self Concept Scale and the Rotter Internal-External Locus of Control Scale. Additionally, Goal Attainment Scaling was used with students who participated in a Counseling Group. Subjects were 21 physically disabled volunteers who were students at The University of Arizona, Tucson, during the fall semester 1980. Subjects were divided into three groups: students enrolled in Adaptive Physical Education classes (n = 7), students participating in a semester long counseling group (n = 6), and students who were neither enrolled in Adaptive Physical Education nor participating in a counseling group (n = 8). The experimental treatment consisted of participation in Adaptive Physical Education twice a week over the course of the semester for Group 1. Group 2 participated in a once per week counseling group for 10 weeks. Subjects in the Control Group did not report receiving regular counseling and were not enrolled in Physical Education classes. The Tennessee Self Concept Scale and Rotter I-E Scale were administered to subjects at the beginning and end of the semester. Additionally, subjects in the Counseling Group established and rated themselves on goals as part of the pre and post treatment assessment. This group also rated the group counseling experience at the end of the semester. The study was designed to see if participation in Adaptive Physical Education or Group Counseling would significantly effect the pre and post treatment mean scores on the Tennessee Self Concept Scale and the Rotter I-E Scale. Analysis of variance of the pre and post treatment mean scores for all three groups did not reveal any statistically significant differences in either Self Concept or Locus of Control scores. All students in the Counseling Group reported achieving their goals and reported the group experience to be a positive one. From the evidence gathered in the study, it was concluded that neither Adaptive Physical Education nor Group Counseling have a statistically significant effect on the self concept or locus of control of physically disabled college students. The small numbers of subjects in the three groups may have been a contributing factor in the failure to achieve any statistically significant difference between the three groups. Recommendations include further study of support services with a larger number of subjects over a longer period of time, further research to identify alternate methods of measuring change and further study of other types of support services.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
College students, Physically handicapped -- Psychology.; Group counseling.; Self-perception.; Control (Psychology)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Counseling and Guidance
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Harshman, Gordon

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleTHE EFFECTS OF SUPPORT SERVICES ON THE SELF CONCEPT, LOCUS OF CONTROL AND GOAL ATTAINMENT OF PHYSICALLY DISABLED COLLEGE STUDENTSen_US
dc.creatorLesh, Kay Christensenen_US
dc.contributor.authorLesh, Kay Christensenen_US
dc.date.issued1981en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractCollege is a time of pressure and stress for students. The presence of a physical disability can be a factor which lends additional complications and adds to the stress and adjustment difficulties in the college years. In recognition of the stresses and pressures and in response to legislative mandates, colleges are beginning to offer programs of support services for physically disabled students. Although the literature supports such offerings as helpful in the adjustment process, little research has been done to determine effectiveness of support services. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of two types of support services, Adaptive Physical Education and Group Counseling on the adjustment of physically disabled students as measured by pre and post treatment mean scores on the Tennessee Self Concept Scale and the Rotter Internal-External Locus of Control Scale. Additionally, Goal Attainment Scaling was used with students who participated in a Counseling Group. Subjects were 21 physically disabled volunteers who were students at The University of Arizona, Tucson, during the fall semester 1980. Subjects were divided into three groups: students enrolled in Adaptive Physical Education classes (n = 7), students participating in a semester long counseling group (n = 6), and students who were neither enrolled in Adaptive Physical Education nor participating in a counseling group (n = 8). The experimental treatment consisted of participation in Adaptive Physical Education twice a week over the course of the semester for Group 1. Group 2 participated in a once per week counseling group for 10 weeks. Subjects in the Control Group did not report receiving regular counseling and were not enrolled in Physical Education classes. The Tennessee Self Concept Scale and Rotter I-E Scale were administered to subjects at the beginning and end of the semester. Additionally, subjects in the Counseling Group established and rated themselves on goals as part of the pre and post treatment assessment. This group also rated the group counseling experience at the end of the semester. The study was designed to see if participation in Adaptive Physical Education or Group Counseling would significantly effect the pre and post treatment mean scores on the Tennessee Self Concept Scale and the Rotter I-E Scale. Analysis of variance of the pre and post treatment mean scores for all three groups did not reveal any statistically significant differences in either Self Concept or Locus of Control scores. All students in the Counseling Group reported achieving their goals and reported the group experience to be a positive one. From the evidence gathered in the study, it was concluded that neither Adaptive Physical Education nor Group Counseling have a statistically significant effect on the self concept or locus of control of physically disabled college students. The small numbers of subjects in the three groups may have been a contributing factor in the failure to achieve any statistically significant difference between the three groups. Recommendations include further study of support services with a larger number of subjects over a longer period of time, further research to identify alternate methods of measuring change and further study of other types of support services.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectCollege students, Physically handicapped -- Psychology.en_US
dc.subjectGroup counseling.en_US
dc.subjectSelf-perception.en_US
dc.subjectControl (Psychology)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCounseling and Guidanceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHarshman, Gordonen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8117739en_US
dc.identifier.oclc8710856en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b13917511en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.