Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/281968
Title:
THE ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OF AN INSTRUCTIONAL SYSTEMS COURSE
Author:
Watson, Russell Wayne
Issue Date:
1981
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Instructional Systems Development is a comprehensive method for the analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation of training. It was produced for the United States Army in 1975 by Florida State University. Since that time, it has been the Army's goal to develop all of its training using this format. This has become increasingly difficult in the case of the U.S. Army Intelligence Center and School, because more and more of its instruction is being developed by civilian contractors. Contract completion dates must continually be extended while contractors train their personnel in the policies and procedures of Instructional Systems Development. Additionally, these delays then serve to increase contract costs. This study was conducted to ameliorate this performance discrepancy by providing a framework for the development of an Instructional Systems Development course for contractors. Both the analysis and design procedures accomplished in this effort were performed using the methods discussed in the actual Instructional Systems Development process. Thus, an instructional course would be developed through the use of the methods it would be teaching. The analysis portion of the study includes a comprehensive major and subordinate task list. This compilation identifies the twelve major tasks a contractor must perform in order to develop training materials according to the Instructional Systems Development process. These are: (1)Perform behavior analysis. (2)Perform analyses procedures. (3)Select tasks for training. (4)Perform all procedures in developing objectives. (5)Assess existing training materials. (6) Design and develop all tests. (7)Perform all sequencing procedures. (8)Develop job aids. (9)Select delivery methodologies. (10)Develop course procedures and control documents. (11)Write all training materials. (12)Validate all training materials. Each task has been analyzed to determine the skills and knowledges required for its satisfactory performance. Thus, the results of the analysis portion of the study are a complete task listing and a compilation of all required skills and knowledges. The design portion of the study concentrates on the pyramiding of all of these identified skills and knowledges. Pyramiding is a process whereby skills and knowledges are displayed in the hierarchical order in which they must be learned. They also provide valuable data for use in the development of instructional maps, detailing the sequences in which students may progress through the course. The final section of the study involves using the information generated in each pyramid to develop complete performance objectives. These objectives provide the framework around which the actual course is to be developed. The final products of the study are the competency tests constructed for each of the performance objectives. The development of the tests at this point in the process ensures that only the objectives are tested and not any extraneous material that might be included by either a course writer or an instructor. Thus, the parameters for a course for contractors working with the United States Army Intelligence Center and School have been defined. These parameters represent the instructional framework for the construction of an Instructional Systems Development course.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Instructional systems -- Design.; Curriculum planning.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Secondary Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Pate, Glenn S.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleTHE ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OF AN INSTRUCTIONAL SYSTEMS COURSEen_US
dc.creatorWatson, Russell Wayneen_US
dc.contributor.authorWatson, Russell Wayneen_US
dc.date.issued1981en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractInstructional Systems Development is a comprehensive method for the analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation of training. It was produced for the United States Army in 1975 by Florida State University. Since that time, it has been the Army's goal to develop all of its training using this format. This has become increasingly difficult in the case of the U.S. Army Intelligence Center and School, because more and more of its instruction is being developed by civilian contractors. Contract completion dates must continually be extended while contractors train their personnel in the policies and procedures of Instructional Systems Development. Additionally, these delays then serve to increase contract costs. This study was conducted to ameliorate this performance discrepancy by providing a framework for the development of an Instructional Systems Development course for contractors. Both the analysis and design procedures accomplished in this effort were performed using the methods discussed in the actual Instructional Systems Development process. Thus, an instructional course would be developed through the use of the methods it would be teaching. The analysis portion of the study includes a comprehensive major and subordinate task list. This compilation identifies the twelve major tasks a contractor must perform in order to develop training materials according to the Instructional Systems Development process. These are: (1)Perform behavior analysis. (2)Perform analyses procedures. (3)Select tasks for training. (4)Perform all procedures in developing objectives. (5)Assess existing training materials. (6) Design and develop all tests. (7)Perform all sequencing procedures. (8)Develop job aids. (9)Select delivery methodologies. (10)Develop course procedures and control documents. (11)Write all training materials. (12)Validate all training materials. Each task has been analyzed to determine the skills and knowledges required for its satisfactory performance. Thus, the results of the analysis portion of the study are a complete task listing and a compilation of all required skills and knowledges. The design portion of the study concentrates on the pyramiding of all of these identified skills and knowledges. Pyramiding is a process whereby skills and knowledges are displayed in the hierarchical order in which they must be learned. They also provide valuable data for use in the development of instructional maps, detailing the sequences in which students may progress through the course. The final section of the study involves using the information generated in each pyramid to develop complete performance objectives. These objectives provide the framework around which the actual course is to be developed. The final products of the study are the competency tests constructed for each of the performance objectives. The development of the tests at this point in the process ensures that only the objectives are tested and not any extraneous material that might be included by either a course writer or an instructor. Thus, the parameters for a course for contractors working with the United States Army Intelligence Center and School have been defined. These parameters represent the instructional framework for the construction of an Instructional Systems Development course.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectInstructional systems -- Design.en_US
dc.subjectCurriculum planning.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSecondary Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPate, Glenn S.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8117737en_US
dc.identifier.oclc8696838en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b13910085en_US
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