EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT TEACHING STRATEGIES AND PREINSTRUCTIONAL BACKGROUNDS OF THE LEARNERS UPON THE INSTRUCTIONAL EFFECTIVENESS OF LIBYAN HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/281967
Title:
EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT TEACHING STRATEGIES AND PREINSTRUCTIONAL BACKGROUNDS OF THE LEARNERS UPON THE INSTRUCTIONAL EFFECTIVENESS OF LIBYAN HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS
Author:
Elkhanjari, Alkoni Ahmed
Issue Date:
1981
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The study investigated the effects of different instructional methods and preinstructional backgrounds of the subjects upon the instructional effectiveness of Libyan high school teachers. The two measures of teaching effectiveness used in the study consisted of student learning as measured by the performance on a domain-referenced achievement test and the student ratings of course effectiveness. The sample for this study consisted of 15 tenth-grade classes in six public high schools located in the City of Tripoli, Libya. A total of 542 subjects participated in the study of whom 331 were male and the remaining 211 were female. The chronological ages of the subjects ranged from 13 1/4 to 28 1/6 years. Each of the selected participating teachers was randomly assigned two tenth-grade classes and was instructed to teach one class by lecture method and the other by discussion method. Thus, the same teachers each taught two different classes with varying instructional methodologies. Five classes taught by the other group of teachers called "non-participating teachers" served as the control group. The content of instruction was selected from a regular geography textbook and was divided into 12 units. Each unit represented a lesson. These lessons were delivered during 6 weeks of instruction at the rate of two lessons a week. Prior to the commencement of the study an achievement test, an ability measure, and an educational attitude scale were administered. At the termination of the study an alternate form of the achievement test and a course effectiveness scale were administered. The data collected were analyzed by using a factorial analysis of variance design. The ability, previous achievement, and educational attitude measures were used as indices of preinstructional backgrounds of the selected subjects. The obtained results indicated that the three instructional methods produced differential effects on subjects with varying aptitudes, especially when the overall previous achievement and ability test scores were used as indicators of learner aptitude. High-aptitude subjects showed the highest amount of learning gains and seemed to be the least affected by differences in the teaching methodologies. Subjects with medium aptitudes benefited most from the discussion method while subjects with low aptitudes profited most from the lecture method. These findings lend some support to the aptitude-treatment interaction phenomenon noted by other researchers. Similar aptitude-treatment interaction effects were not observed when educational attitudes, achievement in geography, and students' perceptions toward courses were used as measures of learner aptitude. The overall direction of the findings led to the conclusion that the effectiveness of different instructional procedures is related to individual characteristics of the learners, and that the aptitude-treatment interaction effects are observable only when global measures of ability and achievement are used as the indicators of the learner aptitudes.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Secondary -- Libya.; Teaching -- Methodology.; Lecture method in teaching.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Educational Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Mishra, Shitala P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEFFECTS OF DIFFERENT TEACHING STRATEGIES AND PREINSTRUCTIONAL BACKGROUNDS OF THE LEARNERS UPON THE INSTRUCTIONAL EFFECTIVENESS OF LIBYAN HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERSen_US
dc.creatorElkhanjari, Alkoni Ahmeden_US
dc.contributor.authorElkhanjari, Alkoni Ahmeden_US
dc.date.issued1981en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe study investigated the effects of different instructional methods and preinstructional backgrounds of the subjects upon the instructional effectiveness of Libyan high school teachers. The two measures of teaching effectiveness used in the study consisted of student learning as measured by the performance on a domain-referenced achievement test and the student ratings of course effectiveness. The sample for this study consisted of 15 tenth-grade classes in six public high schools located in the City of Tripoli, Libya. A total of 542 subjects participated in the study of whom 331 were male and the remaining 211 were female. The chronological ages of the subjects ranged from 13 1/4 to 28 1/6 years. Each of the selected participating teachers was randomly assigned two tenth-grade classes and was instructed to teach one class by lecture method and the other by discussion method. Thus, the same teachers each taught two different classes with varying instructional methodologies. Five classes taught by the other group of teachers called "non-participating teachers" served as the control group. The content of instruction was selected from a regular geography textbook and was divided into 12 units. Each unit represented a lesson. These lessons were delivered during 6 weeks of instruction at the rate of two lessons a week. Prior to the commencement of the study an achievement test, an ability measure, and an educational attitude scale were administered. At the termination of the study an alternate form of the achievement test and a course effectiveness scale were administered. The data collected were analyzed by using a factorial analysis of variance design. The ability, previous achievement, and educational attitude measures were used as indices of preinstructional backgrounds of the selected subjects. The obtained results indicated that the three instructional methods produced differential effects on subjects with varying aptitudes, especially when the overall previous achievement and ability test scores were used as indicators of learner aptitude. High-aptitude subjects showed the highest amount of learning gains and seemed to be the least affected by differences in the teaching methodologies. Subjects with medium aptitudes benefited most from the discussion method while subjects with low aptitudes profited most from the lecture method. These findings lend some support to the aptitude-treatment interaction phenomenon noted by other researchers. Similar aptitude-treatment interaction effects were not observed when educational attitudes, achievement in geography, and students' perceptions toward courses were used as measures of learner aptitude. The overall direction of the findings led to the conclusion that the effectiveness of different instructional procedures is related to individual characteristics of the learners, and that the aptitude-treatment interaction effects are observable only when global measures of ability and achievement are used as the indicators of the learner aptitudes.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Secondary -- Libya.en_US
dc.subjectTeaching -- Methodology.en_US
dc.subjectLecture method in teaching.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMishra, Shitala P.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8116821en_US
dc.identifier.oclc7984757en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b1362264xen_US
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