Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/281945
Title:
BEHAVIOR OF UNDERGROUND LINED CIRCULAR SHAFTS
Author:
Almadhoun, Ibrahim Hasan
Issue Date:
1981
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The results of a study to model a circular mine shaft constructed in a time-dependent medium are presented. The construction sequence is considered as well as the time-dependent properties of the media around the shaft. The loads acting on the shaft liner are due to excavation of the shaft material and to the loads relieved from the media onto the liner. The results show the importance of considering the time-dependent behavior of media. The analysis was carried out using the Finite Element Method. Axisymmetric triangular and quadrilateral elements were used to model the medium, and axisymmetric shell elements were used to model the liner. The construction sequence was modeled by analyzing the system under small load increments where each load increment represents a construction step. The time behavior was modeled by using the initial strain method, which assigns a different strain value for each element in the medium. The strains are transferred to stresses and then to forces, and an incremental process is started to cover the time range desired. The results for a 400-foot shaft are shown, and changes in liner stresses were monitored as time passes. Different rock materials were modeled by using different constants in the creep law. Some materials showed significant changes in the results, and others did not. The liner horizontal displacement, and horizontal and vertical stresses increased when material constants for rock salt and anhydrite were used. Stresses in the elements adjacent to the liner decreased as time passed by, and some even went into a tensile stress site. A comparison between two solutions, one representing a multi-step construction sequence and another representing an instantaneous construction of the lined shaft, showed that liner stresses are much higher when the construction sequence is not modeled. This is due to the fact that when the excavation is modeled the forces representing the construction sequence are applied to the medium. In the other case, the forces are directly applied to the liner.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Finite element method -- Computer programs.; Mine shafts -- Computer programs.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Daeman, Jaak J. K.; Sogge, Robert L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleBEHAVIOR OF UNDERGROUND LINED CIRCULAR SHAFTSen_US
dc.creatorAlmadhoun, Ibrahim Hasanen_US
dc.contributor.authorAlmadhoun, Ibrahim Hasanen_US
dc.date.issued1981en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe results of a study to model a circular mine shaft constructed in a time-dependent medium are presented. The construction sequence is considered as well as the time-dependent properties of the media around the shaft. The loads acting on the shaft liner are due to excavation of the shaft material and to the loads relieved from the media onto the liner. The results show the importance of considering the time-dependent behavior of media. The analysis was carried out using the Finite Element Method. Axisymmetric triangular and quadrilateral elements were used to model the medium, and axisymmetric shell elements were used to model the liner. The construction sequence was modeled by analyzing the system under small load increments where each load increment represents a construction step. The time behavior was modeled by using the initial strain method, which assigns a different strain value for each element in the medium. The strains are transferred to stresses and then to forces, and an incremental process is started to cover the time range desired. The results for a 400-foot shaft are shown, and changes in liner stresses were monitored as time passes. Different rock materials were modeled by using different constants in the creep law. Some materials showed significant changes in the results, and others did not. The liner horizontal displacement, and horizontal and vertical stresses increased when material constants for rock salt and anhydrite were used. Stresses in the elements adjacent to the liner decreased as time passed by, and some even went into a tensile stress site. A comparison between two solutions, one representing a multi-step construction sequence and another representing an instantaneous construction of the lined shaft, showed that liner stresses are much higher when the construction sequence is not modeled. This is due to the fact that when the excavation is modeled the forces representing the construction sequence are applied to the medium. In the other case, the forces are directly applied to the liner.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectFinite element method -- Computer programs.en_US
dc.subjectMine shafts -- Computer programs.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil Engineering and Engineering Mechanicsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDaeman, Jaak J. K.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorSogge, Robert L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8116690en_US
dc.identifier.oclc8679867en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b13902775en_US
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