Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/281918
Title:
DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING TECHNIQUES APPLIED TO CHROMATOGRAPHY
Author:
Villalanti, Carl Daniel
Issue Date:
1980
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The field of analytical chemistry has always taken advantage of advances from other fields. The application of digital signal processing techniques to chromatographic systems has been shown to enhance the chemical information concerning the solute-adsorbent interaction. Applying the techniques of Fourier transforms, spectrum analysis, correlation, and convolution has expanded the scope of multiple injection type experiments. A review of these signal processing techniques relevant to analytical chemistry is given. The effects of restricting the concentration range a solute undergoes was the impetus for a new type of multiple injection experiment, known as frequency modulated (FM) correlation chromatography. By limiting the deviation in concentration to a small portion of the isotherm, gaussian shaped peaks can be obtained even when working in a nonlinear portion of the isotherm. The characterization of the experimental parameters in FM experiments (i.e. carrier frequency and modulation bandwidth) and the effects on peak shape, retention time, and signal-to-noise ratios was evaluated. The FM multiple injection technique was then applied to the study of linear and nonlinear behavior on a homogenous (i.e. Porapak) and heterogeneous (i.e. Durapak) chromatographic support. Specific types and strengths of solute-adsorbent interacts are proposed. The implications of multiplex and modulated techniques to linear system chromatography and the isolation of extra-column band-broadening effect (via a Fourier deconvolution approach) in modern open tubular GC and HPLC conclude this work.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Chromatographic analysis -- Data processing.; Frequencies of oscillating systems.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Chemistry
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Burke, M. F.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleDIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING TECHNIQUES APPLIED TO CHROMATOGRAPHYen_US
dc.creatorVillalanti, Carl Danielen_US
dc.contributor.authorVillalanti, Carl Danielen_US
dc.date.issued1980en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe field of analytical chemistry has always taken advantage of advances from other fields. The application of digital signal processing techniques to chromatographic systems has been shown to enhance the chemical information concerning the solute-adsorbent interaction. Applying the techniques of Fourier transforms, spectrum analysis, correlation, and convolution has expanded the scope of multiple injection type experiments. A review of these signal processing techniques relevant to analytical chemistry is given. The effects of restricting the concentration range a solute undergoes was the impetus for a new type of multiple injection experiment, known as frequency modulated (FM) correlation chromatography. By limiting the deviation in concentration to a small portion of the isotherm, gaussian shaped peaks can be obtained even when working in a nonlinear portion of the isotherm. The characterization of the experimental parameters in FM experiments (i.e. carrier frequency and modulation bandwidth) and the effects on peak shape, retention time, and signal-to-noise ratios was evaluated. The FM multiple injection technique was then applied to the study of linear and nonlinear behavior on a homogenous (i.e. Porapak) and heterogeneous (i.e. Durapak) chromatographic support. Specific types and strengths of solute-adsorbent interacts are proposed. The implications of multiplex and modulated techniques to linear system chromatography and the isolation of extra-column band-broadening effect (via a Fourier deconvolution approach) in modern open tubular GC and HPLC conclude this work.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectChromatographic analysis -- Data processing.en_US
dc.subjectFrequencies of oscillating systems.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBurke, M. F.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8109047en_US
dc.identifier.oclc8671703en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b18059582en_US
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