A PROPOSED CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM FOR THE PROCESS OF ADMINISTRATION

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/281916
Title:
A PROPOSED CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM FOR THE PROCESS OF ADMINISTRATION
Author:
Linthicum, Seth Hance
Issue Date:
1980
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this dissertation was to apply a proposed classification system based on six categorical divisions of a seven circle pattern to the concept, administration. Its applicability was measured by comparison of this classification system with that of the Dewey Decimal Classification System (DDC) concerning administration. The proposed system might prove more efficient in locating terms in this subject-field. For the purpose of the study, administration was viewed as a process for the accomplishment of goals. Six generic terms proposed by the researcher form the structure of a proposed septimal classification system which was applied to the administrative process. These generic terms were used: (1) permanence, (2) change, (3) value, (4) interrelationships, (5) structure, and (6) application. This structure provides a different sequence and order from the various designs of this concept as proposed by scholars of administration, from Fayol through Getzels and Halpin. The researcher selected six generic facets to categorize terms in administration which were cited as sub-processes of the administrative process. The generic categories used to categorize the major sub-processes of administration represent those derived from the cultural scope, knowledge and experience of the researcher; these generic categories could form the divisions of any single concept. They were projected to divide administration, but together represented a complete administrative process from goals to their achievement, and conveyed an understanding of the concept of administration. The proposed Septimal Classification System was applied by categorizing terms used to describe this process by selected authors. A comparative test of the proposed Septimal Classification System with the DDC was made; also, the terms used by authorities in the field to divide their subject matter were subjected to narrative analysis. An attempt was made to show the completeness of the concept of administration from its associative elements. In this analysis, the terms and content were developed from a review of authors on administration and were compared with those developed in the proposed classification system. A comparison of classification systems was made (with the DDC) by differential criteria. Each classification system categorized ideas in administration; the categories of the Septimal system provided a guide or structure for, and unified the process of administration for the student or practitioner in a way that was found lacking in the DDC. The results of the comparison were not conclusive. Whether the proposed system would improve the book classification of the DDC could not be determined by this study. This study showed the ideas within the concept, administration, could be classified into a meaningful process containing the terms of selected authors in the field in different categories. Its ease of use, however, was largely dependent on the selection and allocation by the user of the generic categories, proposed in the study. This led to the conclusion that the application of the Septimal Classification System, if perfected by other users in the field, could lead to an ordered view of the concept, administration, which would encompass the various cited approaches explaining this subject-field. Continued application of the Septimal classification and its generic categories as a structural model to classify subjects in other subject areas, could facilitate an understanding of any subject-field. The student of administration in fields other than education could discover new relationships by application of the Septimal Classification System.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
School management and organization.; Management -- Terminology.; Management -- Classification.
Degree Name:
Educat.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Educational Foundations and Administration
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Butler, Henry E. Jr.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleA PROPOSED CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM FOR THE PROCESS OF ADMINISTRATIONen_US
dc.creatorLinthicum, Seth Hanceen_US
dc.contributor.authorLinthicum, Seth Hanceen_US
dc.date.issued1980en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this dissertation was to apply a proposed classification system based on six categorical divisions of a seven circle pattern to the concept, administration. Its applicability was measured by comparison of this classification system with that of the Dewey Decimal Classification System (DDC) concerning administration. The proposed system might prove more efficient in locating terms in this subject-field. For the purpose of the study, administration was viewed as a process for the accomplishment of goals. Six generic terms proposed by the researcher form the structure of a proposed septimal classification system which was applied to the administrative process. These generic terms were used: (1) permanence, (2) change, (3) value, (4) interrelationships, (5) structure, and (6) application. This structure provides a different sequence and order from the various designs of this concept as proposed by scholars of administration, from Fayol through Getzels and Halpin. The researcher selected six generic facets to categorize terms in administration which were cited as sub-processes of the administrative process. The generic categories used to categorize the major sub-processes of administration represent those derived from the cultural scope, knowledge and experience of the researcher; these generic categories could form the divisions of any single concept. They were projected to divide administration, but together represented a complete administrative process from goals to their achievement, and conveyed an understanding of the concept of administration. The proposed Septimal Classification System was applied by categorizing terms used to describe this process by selected authors. A comparative test of the proposed Septimal Classification System with the DDC was made; also, the terms used by authorities in the field to divide their subject matter were subjected to narrative analysis. An attempt was made to show the completeness of the concept of administration from its associative elements. In this analysis, the terms and content were developed from a review of authors on administration and were compared with those developed in the proposed classification system. A comparison of classification systems was made (with the DDC) by differential criteria. Each classification system categorized ideas in administration; the categories of the Septimal system provided a guide or structure for, and unified the process of administration for the student or practitioner in a way that was found lacking in the DDC. The results of the comparison were not conclusive. Whether the proposed system would improve the book classification of the DDC could not be determined by this study. This study showed the ideas within the concept, administration, could be classified into a meaningful process containing the terms of selected authors in the field in different categories. Its ease of use, however, was largely dependent on the selection and allocation by the user of the generic categories, proposed in the study. This led to the conclusion that the application of the Septimal Classification System, if perfected by other users in the field, could lead to an ordered view of the concept, administration, which would encompass the various cited approaches explaining this subject-field. Continued application of the Septimal classification and its generic categories as a structural model to classify subjects in other subject areas, could facilitate an understanding of any subject-field. The student of administration in fields other than education could discover new relationships by application of the Septimal Classification System.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSchool management and organization.en_US
dc.subjectManagement -- Terminology.en_US
dc.subjectManagement -- Classification.en_US
thesis.degree.nameEducat.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Foundations and Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorButler, Henry E. Jr.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8017762en_US
dc.identifier.oclc7429662en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b13383516en_US
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