A STUDY OF PERCEPTUAL PATTERNS OF YOUTH-IN-TROUBLE REGARDING PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS IN THE SCHOOL AND THE HOME

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/281900
Title:
A STUDY OF PERCEPTUAL PATTERNS OF YOUTH-IN-TROUBLE REGARDING PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS IN THE SCHOOL AND THE HOME
Author:
Milner, Don R.
Issue Date:
1980
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study was designed to investigate the following problem: Among a selected group of secondary school students who are considered to be youth-in-trouble, what perceptual patterns exist concerning their personal relationships within the school and the home? The setting is in a rapidly growing community in the southwestern United States. A theoretical framework was selected which emphasized personal processes. It included the categories of: (1) contact, (2) consult, (3) share, (4) choose. A search of literature related to the categories of the framework was conducted. On the basis of the theoretical framework, a questionnaire was designed with statements consisting of 16 items reflecting the four categories of contact, consult, share, and choose and was administered to a sample of youth who were judged to be youth-in-trouble to probe certain relationships experienced by youth-in-trouble in the school and in the home. The data derived from the questionnaire were then organized under the four categories of the theoretical framework. According to "The Theory of Personal Processes" used in this investigation, contact must occur at the outset of any interaction and must persist throughout the relationship. At a very early point in the interaction, consultation becomes an extension of contact and thereby supplies the means by which the interests of the youths are discovered. These interests constitute the basic ingredient for the interaction. As the interactive process continues, sharing, a mutual exchange of ideas and interests, is the basis of cooperative effort. Throughout the interactive process, choosing should be at a maximum if there is to be a high degree of freedom and democratic living. The investigation revealed the followng patterns: (1) Contact: The youth-in-trouble reported little effective contact between themselves and their parents. The youth-in-trouble reported little effective contact between themselves and their teachers. (2) Consult: The youth-in-trouble reported little effective consultation between themselves and their parents. The youth-in-trouble reported little effective consultation between themselves and their teachers. (3) Share: The youth-in-trouble reported little effective sharing between themselves and their parents. The youth-in-trouble reported litttle effective sharing between themselves and their teachers. (4) Choose: The youth-in-trouble reported little effective choosing between themselves and their parents. The youth-in-trouble reported little effective choosing between themselves and their teachers. In light of the above findings, it can be concluded that the youth-in-trouble who were studied in this investigation generally seemed not to perceive themselves as operating in home and school environments of freedom and democratic living.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Problem children -- Psychology.; Interpersonal relations.; Interpersonal communication.; Teacher-student relationships.; Parent and child.
Degree Name:
Educat.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Secondary Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Barnes, William D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleA STUDY OF PERCEPTUAL PATTERNS OF YOUTH-IN-TROUBLE REGARDING PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS IN THE SCHOOL AND THE HOMEen_US
dc.creatorMilner, Don R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMilner, Don R.en_US
dc.date.issued1980en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study was designed to investigate the following problem: Among a selected group of secondary school students who are considered to be youth-in-trouble, what perceptual patterns exist concerning their personal relationships within the school and the home? The setting is in a rapidly growing community in the southwestern United States. A theoretical framework was selected which emphasized personal processes. It included the categories of: (1) contact, (2) consult, (3) share, (4) choose. A search of literature related to the categories of the framework was conducted. On the basis of the theoretical framework, a questionnaire was designed with statements consisting of 16 items reflecting the four categories of contact, consult, share, and choose and was administered to a sample of youth who were judged to be youth-in-trouble to probe certain relationships experienced by youth-in-trouble in the school and in the home. The data derived from the questionnaire were then organized under the four categories of the theoretical framework. According to "The Theory of Personal Processes" used in this investigation, contact must occur at the outset of any interaction and must persist throughout the relationship. At a very early point in the interaction, consultation becomes an extension of contact and thereby supplies the means by which the interests of the youths are discovered. These interests constitute the basic ingredient for the interaction. As the interactive process continues, sharing, a mutual exchange of ideas and interests, is the basis of cooperative effort. Throughout the interactive process, choosing should be at a maximum if there is to be a high degree of freedom and democratic living. The investigation revealed the followng patterns: (1) Contact: The youth-in-trouble reported little effective contact between themselves and their parents. The youth-in-trouble reported little effective contact between themselves and their teachers. (2) Consult: The youth-in-trouble reported little effective consultation between themselves and their parents. The youth-in-trouble reported little effective consultation between themselves and their teachers. (3) Share: The youth-in-trouble reported little effective sharing between themselves and their parents. The youth-in-trouble reported litttle effective sharing between themselves and their teachers. (4) Choose: The youth-in-trouble reported little effective choosing between themselves and their parents. The youth-in-trouble reported little effective choosing between themselves and their teachers. In light of the above findings, it can be concluded that the youth-in-trouble who were studied in this investigation generally seemed not to perceive themselves as operating in home and school environments of freedom and democratic living.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectProblem children -- Psychology.en_US
dc.subjectInterpersonal relations.en_US
dc.subjectInterpersonal communication.en_US
dc.subjectTeacher-student relationships.en_US
dc.subjectParent and child.en_US
thesis.degree.nameEducat.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSecondary Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBarnes, William D.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8107443en_US
dc.identifier.oclc8258595en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b23484184en_US
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