Effect of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome on Trial-to-Trial Adaptation to Object Mass-Sensorimotor Integration for Multi-Digit Grasping

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/281794
Title:
Effect of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome on Trial-to-Trial Adaptation to Object Mass-Sensorimotor Integration for Multi-Digit Grasping
Author:
Sanniec, Kyle
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
Jan-2013
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2013 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Introduction/Objective: Somatosensory feedback from the fingertips is integrated with voluntary control of hand muscles in order to successfully grip objects. This integration can be disrupted in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) and lead to dropping objects. This raises the question of how the central nervous system (CNS) integrates sensory information from CTS-affected and non-affected digits. The primary objective was to use CTS as a model to understand mechanisms underlying sensorimotor integration responsible for whole-hand griping of objects with a changing mass. CTS patients should be able to modulate digit forces to object weight, however, as different grip types involve the exclusive use of CTS-affected digits or a combination of CTS-affected and non-affected digits, we hypothesize sensorimotor deficits to be larger for grips involving the coordination of CTS-affected and non-affected digits. Methods: Sixteen CTS patients (3 males, 13 females) and age- and gender-matched controls participated in the study. Subjects were instructed to use one of four grip types: two digits, three digits, four digits, or all five digits to grasp, lift, hold level and release a grip device for 7 consecutive lifts. Object mass was changed across blocks of trials by inserting either a “light mass” (445g) or a “heavy mass” (745g) underneath the grip device. Force and torque exerted by each digit were measured. Results: CTS patients learned multi-digit force modulation to object weight regardless of grip type. Although controls exerted the same total grip force across all grip types, patients exerted significantly larger grip force than controls but only for manipulations with four and five digits. Importantly, this effect was due to CTS patients’ inability to change the finger force distribution when adding the ring and little fingers. Significance: These findings indicate CTS primarily challenges sensorimotor integration processes underlying the coordination of CTS-affected and non-affected digits.
MeSH Subjects:
Carpal Tunnel Syndrome; Nerve Compression Syndromes
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
Smith, Anthony, MD

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEffect of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome on Trial-to-Trial Adaptation to Object Mass-Sensorimotor Integration for Multi-Digit Graspingen_US
dc.contributor.authorSanniec, Kyleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen_US
dc.date.issued2013-01-
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2013 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.description.abstractIntroduction/Objective: Somatosensory feedback from the fingertips is integrated with voluntary control of hand muscles in order to successfully grip objects. This integration can be disrupted in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) and lead to dropping objects. This raises the question of how the central nervous system (CNS) integrates sensory information from CTS-affected and non-affected digits. The primary objective was to use CTS as a model to understand mechanisms underlying sensorimotor integration responsible for whole-hand griping of objects with a changing mass. CTS patients should be able to modulate digit forces to object weight, however, as different grip types involve the exclusive use of CTS-affected digits or a combination of CTS-affected and non-affected digits, we hypothesize sensorimotor deficits to be larger for grips involving the coordination of CTS-affected and non-affected digits. Methods: Sixteen CTS patients (3 males, 13 females) and age- and gender-matched controls participated in the study. Subjects were instructed to use one of four grip types: two digits, three digits, four digits, or all five digits to grasp, lift, hold level and release a grip device for 7 consecutive lifts. Object mass was changed across blocks of trials by inserting either a “light mass” (445g) or a “heavy mass” (745g) underneath the grip device. Force and torque exerted by each digit were measured. Results: CTS patients learned multi-digit force modulation to object weight regardless of grip type. Although controls exerted the same total grip force across all grip types, patients exerted significantly larger grip force than controls but only for manipulations with four and five digits. Importantly, this effect was due to CTS patients’ inability to change the finger force distribution when adding the ring and little fingers. Significance: These findings indicate CTS primarily challenges sensorimotor integration processes underlying the coordination of CTS-affected and non-affected digits.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.subject.meshCarpal Tunnel Syndromeen_US
dc.subject.meshNerve Compression Syndromesen_US
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorSmith, Anthony, MDen_US
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