Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/281793
Title:
Determining variable contagiousness of MRSA by setting
Author:
Routh, Joshua
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
Mar-2013
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2013 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Objective and Hypothesis Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is currently a major cause of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) in the United States. In order to characterize the spread of MRSA in the pediatric population we built a probabilistic, discrete-event, individual-based simulation. Specifically, our model looked at the spread of MRSA in households and at schools to determine if there was a difference in communicability between the two settings. Methods We developed a probabilistic, discrete-event, individual-based model. This model was validated using insurance billing data for skin and soft tissue infections. The first validation trained the model for two years of data, and validated it with the next two years of data. The second method trained the model in one region and validated it in another. Following the validation, the Poisson-bootstrap resampling method was used to find specific values for a contagiousness factor(CF) in households and schools. Results Both methods of validation supported the model with no statistically significant difference. The bootstrap resulted in a CFhousehold of 30.69 (95% CI [29.09, 32.29]) and a CFschool of 0.55 (95% CI [0.46 to 0.64]). Effective reproduction number for the school setting was found to be 0.0015 and 0.06 to 3.04 for households of different size. Conclusion In this study we characterize a marked difference in communicability in the household and at school, which has not previously been shown. The identification of colonization clusters in households can be used to design strategies reduce the disease burden. The model can be used to simulate and predict responses to different interventions.
Keywords:
Colonization
MeSH Subjects:
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus; Community-Acquired Infections
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
Panchanathan, Sarada, MD, MS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleDetermining variable contagiousness of MRSA by settingen_US
dc.contributor.authorRouth, Joshuaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen_US
dc.date.issued2013-03-
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2013 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.description.abstractObjective and Hypothesis Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is currently a major cause of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) in the United States. In order to characterize the spread of MRSA in the pediatric population we built a probabilistic, discrete-event, individual-based simulation. Specifically, our model looked at the spread of MRSA in households and at schools to determine if there was a difference in communicability between the two settings. Methods We developed a probabilistic, discrete-event, individual-based model. This model was validated using insurance billing data for skin and soft tissue infections. The first validation trained the model for two years of data, and validated it with the next two years of data. The second method trained the model in one region and validated it in another. Following the validation, the Poisson-bootstrap resampling method was used to find specific values for a contagiousness factor(CF) in households and schools. Results Both methods of validation supported the model with no statistically significant difference. The bootstrap resulted in a CFhousehold of 30.69 (95% CI [29.09, 32.29]) and a CFschool of 0.55 (95% CI [0.46 to 0.64]). Effective reproduction number for the school setting was found to be 0.0015 and 0.06 to 3.04 for households of different size. Conclusion In this study we characterize a marked difference in communicability in the household and at school, which has not previously been shown. The identification of colonization clusters in households can be used to design strategies reduce the disease burden. The model can be used to simulate and predict responses to different interventions.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.subjectColonizationen_US
dc.subject.meshMethicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureusen_US
dc.subject.meshCommunity-Acquired Infectionsen_US
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorPanchanathan, Sarada, MD, MSen_US
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