Safety and efficacy of lung recruitment maneuvers in post-­‐operative pediatric cardiac surgical patients

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/281775
Title:
Safety and efficacy of lung recruitment maneuvers in post-­‐operative pediatric cardiac surgical patients
Author:
Morandi, Tiffany
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
Mar-2013
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2013 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the safety of lung recruitment maneuvers in post-operative pediatric cardiac surgical patients. To assess the ability of lung recruitment maneuvers to improve lung function. HYPOTHESIS: We hypothesize that ventilator recruitment strategies be well-­tolerated in cardiac patients, and that they may benefit such patients by improving physiologic variables such as lung function and oxygenation. METHODS: Sixty‐two pediatric post-operative cardiac surgical patients were randomly selected to include in this retrospective chart review. Study subjects were selected from all patients who met inclusion criteria in the year immediately following implementation of a lung recruitment protocol in a local free‐standing pediatric hospital. Physiologic variables before, during, and after lung recruitment were recorded as well as patient demographics, diagnoses, morbidities and mortality. RESULTS: A statistically significant increase in dynamic compliance of the lungs and renal non-invasive regional oximetry was noted immediately after each recruitment maneuver. There was no statistically significant change in blood pressure, heart rate or oxygen saturation during the maneuvers. There was a transient increase in central venous pressure during the maneuvers (average increase < 1 mmHg). Of the 62 patients, there were 7 cases of pneumonia and 5 cases of small pneumothorax, often resolving without intervention. Significance: Demonstrating recruitment maneuvers are safe in pediatric patients with cardiac disease will allow practitioners to confidently utilize them when caring for ventilated patients. Such patients may benefit from potential improvements in lung function and decreased ventilator-associated morbidities.
Keywords:
Pediatric
MeSH Subjects:
Postoperative Care; Ventilators, Mechanical
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
Willis, Brigham C., MD

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSafety and efficacy of lung recruitment maneuvers in post-­‐operative pediatric cardiac surgical patientsen_US
dc.contributor.authorMorandi, Tiffanyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen_US
dc.date.issued2013-03-
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2013 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the safety of lung recruitment maneuvers in post-operative pediatric cardiac surgical patients. To assess the ability of lung recruitment maneuvers to improve lung function. HYPOTHESIS: We hypothesize that ventilator recruitment strategies be well-­tolerated in cardiac patients, and that they may benefit such patients by improving physiologic variables such as lung function and oxygenation. METHODS: Sixty‐two pediatric post-operative cardiac surgical patients were randomly selected to include in this retrospective chart review. Study subjects were selected from all patients who met inclusion criteria in the year immediately following implementation of a lung recruitment protocol in a local free‐standing pediatric hospital. Physiologic variables before, during, and after lung recruitment were recorded as well as patient demographics, diagnoses, morbidities and mortality. RESULTS: A statistically significant increase in dynamic compliance of the lungs and renal non-invasive regional oximetry was noted immediately after each recruitment maneuver. There was no statistically significant change in blood pressure, heart rate or oxygen saturation during the maneuvers. There was a transient increase in central venous pressure during the maneuvers (average increase < 1 mmHg). Of the 62 patients, there were 7 cases of pneumonia and 5 cases of small pneumothorax, often resolving without intervention. Significance: Demonstrating recruitment maneuvers are safe in pediatric patients with cardiac disease will allow practitioners to confidently utilize them when caring for ventilated patients. Such patients may benefit from potential improvements in lung function and decreased ventilator-associated morbidities.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.subjectPediatricen_US
dc.subject.meshPostoperative Careen_US
dc.subject.meshVentilators, Mechanicalen_US
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorWillis, Brigham C., MDen_US
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