Assessing the University of Arizona Medical School Admission Committee Members’ Knowledge of Predictors of Rural Practice for Medical School Applicants

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/281773
Title:
Assessing the University of Arizona Medical School Admission Committee Members’ Knowledge of Predictors of Rural Practice for Medical School Applicants
Author:
LeSueur, Philip
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
Mar-2013
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2013 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Objective: There is a disparity in physician to population ratios between rural and urban Arizona. The University of Arizona Medical School has a unique opportunity to increase the supply of physicians serving in rural Arizona through its admissions process. This study is a quality improvement project which examined whether or not the admission committee members at both the Tucson and Phoenix campuses are considering probability of future rural practice when making admission decisions and if they know the evidence based predictors for rural practice. Methods: The admission committee members from the University of Arizona Medical School were asked to fill out a questionnaire regarding their preferences for future rural practitioners and if they knew the two most accurate predictors for rural practice. Results: There were 22 respondents to the survey- 12 out of 13 from Phoenix and 10 out of 14 from Tucson. Fifty-nine percent (n=13) of the total respondents listed likelihood to practice in a rural community as positively affecting their admission decision, 27 percent (n=6) said it does not affect their decision at all, and 13 percent (n=3) said it affects their decision very positively. All 22 respondents correctly identified rural background as one of the two strongest predictors of rural practice while 11 correctly identified stated interest in family practice as the other. Conclusion: The University of Arizona Medical School admissions committees are well positioned to increase the supply of rural physicians in Arizona. Even still, some of the members of the committee could benefit from education regarding accurate predictors of rural practice.
MeSH Subjects:
Rural Health Services; Advisory Committees; Education, Medical, Undergraduate
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
Galper, Carol, PhD

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAssessing the University of Arizona Medical School Admission Committee Members’ Knowledge of Predictors of Rural Practice for Medical School Applicantsen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeSueur, Philipen_US
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen_US
dc.date.issued2013-03-
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2013 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.description.abstractObjective: There is a disparity in physician to population ratios between rural and urban Arizona. The University of Arizona Medical School has a unique opportunity to increase the supply of physicians serving in rural Arizona through its admissions process. This study is a quality improvement project which examined whether or not the admission committee members at both the Tucson and Phoenix campuses are considering probability of future rural practice when making admission decisions and if they know the evidence based predictors for rural practice. Methods: The admission committee members from the University of Arizona Medical School were asked to fill out a questionnaire regarding their preferences for future rural practitioners and if they knew the two most accurate predictors for rural practice. Results: There were 22 respondents to the survey- 12 out of 13 from Phoenix and 10 out of 14 from Tucson. Fifty-nine percent (n=13) of the total respondents listed likelihood to practice in a rural community as positively affecting their admission decision, 27 percent (n=6) said it does not affect their decision at all, and 13 percent (n=3) said it affects their decision very positively. All 22 respondents correctly identified rural background as one of the two strongest predictors of rural practice while 11 correctly identified stated interest in family practice as the other. Conclusion: The University of Arizona Medical School admissions committees are well positioned to increase the supply of rural physicians in Arizona. Even still, some of the members of the committee could benefit from education regarding accurate predictors of rural practice.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.subject.meshRural Health Servicesen_US
dc.subject.meshAdvisory Committeesen_US
dc.subject.meshEducation, Medical, Undergraduateen_US
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorGalper, Carol, PhDen_US
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