Success Rates for Reduction of Pediatric Distal Radius and Ulna Fractures by ED Physicians

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/281753
Title:
Success Rates for Reduction of Pediatric Distal Radius and Ulna Fractures by ED Physicians
Author:
Kaye, Bryan
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
Mar-2013
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2013 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Objective: To determine the success rates for reduction of pediatric distal radius and/or ulna fractures by emergency department (ED) physicians. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of children <18 years of age who presented to a large, urban free standing children’s hospital between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2010 with a fracture of the radius and/or ulna. Patients were excluded if they had an open fracture, were taken directly to the operating room without attempted ED manipulation, or had additional fractures besides isolated radius/ulna fractures. The primary endpoint was the proportion of successful reductions of closed forearm fractures in the ED, as defined by first orthopedic follow up visit. Results: All reductions were performed by Board certified/eligible Pediatric Emergency Medicine (PEM) physician or PEM fellow. There were a total of 15 different PEM faculty and 10 PEM fellows that were involved in the fracture reductions during the study period. There were 295 forearm fractures reduced in the ED during the study period. The mean age was 8.27 years (median 8 years; range 1 to 16) and males comprised 69.2% (n=204) of the study group. A total of 225 (76.3%) fractures were of the distal forearm and 70 involved the midshaft (23.7%). All but 67 (22.7%) patients returned for their orthopedic follow up exam. A total of 33 (14.5%) of all patients required re-manipulation at follow up; 24 in the distal forearm fracture group (22 were closed reductions and 2 open reduction with internal fixation [ORIF]), versus 9 in the midshaft group (7 closed reductions and 2 ORIF). Conclusion: The literature reveals that between 7% and 39% of children who have fracture reductions in the ED by orthopedics will require re-manipulation. Our rate of 14.5% is consistent within that range. With training, pediatric ED physicians have similar success rates as orthopedists in the reduction of forearm fractures.
Keywords:
Pediatric
MeSH Subjects:
Fractures, Bone; Child; Emergency Medical Services
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
Bulloch, Blake, MD

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSuccess Rates for Reduction of Pediatric Distal Radius and Ulna Fractures by ED Physiciansen_US
dc.contributor.authorKaye, Bryanen_US
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen_US
dc.date.issued2013-03-
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2013 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.description.abstractObjective: To determine the success rates for reduction of pediatric distal radius and/or ulna fractures by emergency department (ED) physicians. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of children <18 years of age who presented to a large, urban free standing children’s hospital between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2010 with a fracture of the radius and/or ulna. Patients were excluded if they had an open fracture, were taken directly to the operating room without attempted ED manipulation, or had additional fractures besides isolated radius/ulna fractures. The primary endpoint was the proportion of successful reductions of closed forearm fractures in the ED, as defined by first orthopedic follow up visit. Results: All reductions were performed by Board certified/eligible Pediatric Emergency Medicine (PEM) physician or PEM fellow. There were a total of 15 different PEM faculty and 10 PEM fellows that were involved in the fracture reductions during the study period. There were 295 forearm fractures reduced in the ED during the study period. The mean age was 8.27 years (median 8 years; range 1 to 16) and males comprised 69.2% (n=204) of the study group. A total of 225 (76.3%) fractures were of the distal forearm and 70 involved the midshaft (23.7%). All but 67 (22.7%) patients returned for their orthopedic follow up exam. A total of 33 (14.5%) of all patients required re-manipulation at follow up; 24 in the distal forearm fracture group (22 were closed reductions and 2 open reduction with internal fixation [ORIF]), versus 9 in the midshaft group (7 closed reductions and 2 ORIF). Conclusion: The literature reveals that between 7% and 39% of children who have fracture reductions in the ED by orthopedics will require re-manipulation. Our rate of 14.5% is consistent within that range. With training, pediatric ED physicians have similar success rates as orthopedists in the reduction of forearm fractures.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.subjectPediatricen_US
dc.subject.meshFractures, Boneen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshEmergency Medical Servicesen_US
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorBulloch, Blake, MDen_US
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