Effectiveness of Pharmacological Treatments in Imploding vs. Exploding Headaches

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/281156
Title:
Effectiveness of Pharmacological Treatments in Imploding vs. Exploding Headaches
Author:
Hunt, Megan
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
Mar-2013
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2013 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Recent research shows variability in the effectiveness of botulinum toxin A among patients who experience their headaches as imploding compared with those who experience exploding headache sensations. Further research has not yet examined whether such variability exists among other pharmacological treatments. This study examines the effectiveness of acute and preventative medications in imploding vs. exploding headaches. 201 patients were recruited in the Women’s Health Internal Medicine Program at Mayo Clinic. These patients were given surveys to determine their physician identified headache type (imploding, exploding, or ocular), as well as patient-reported information about the effectiveness of prophylactic medications or triptans. This data was analyzed to determine whether a significant difference existed between medications that were effective for imploding, exploding, or ocular headaches. The study found that no such difference existed. The data was also used to analyze the correlation between physician-identified headache type and the patient-identified headache type. There appears to be only a weak correlation between these assignments, suggesting some room for improvement in the way headache directionality is explored by physician and understood by patients. In the future, research will hopefully uncover additional factors which are useful as predictors for migraine pharmacology.
MeSH Subjects:
Headache Disorders; Botulinum Toxins, Type A
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
Files, Julia, MD

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEffectiveness of Pharmacological Treatments in Imploding vs. Exploding Headachesen_US
dc.contributor.authorHunt, Meganen_US
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen_US
dc.date.issued2013-03-
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2013 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.description.abstractRecent research shows variability in the effectiveness of botulinum toxin A among patients who experience their headaches as imploding compared with those who experience exploding headache sensations. Further research has not yet examined whether such variability exists among other pharmacological treatments. This study examines the effectiveness of acute and preventative medications in imploding vs. exploding headaches. 201 patients were recruited in the Women’s Health Internal Medicine Program at Mayo Clinic. These patients were given surveys to determine their physician identified headache type (imploding, exploding, or ocular), as well as patient-reported information about the effectiveness of prophylactic medications or triptans. This data was analyzed to determine whether a significant difference existed between medications that were effective for imploding, exploding, or ocular headaches. The study found that no such difference existed. The data was also used to analyze the correlation between physician-identified headache type and the patient-identified headache type. There appears to be only a weak correlation between these assignments, suggesting some room for improvement in the way headache directionality is explored by physician and understood by patients. In the future, research will hopefully uncover additional factors which are useful as predictors for migraine pharmacology.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.subject.meshHeadache Disordersen_US
dc.subject.meshBotulinum Toxins, Type Aen_US
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorFiles, Julia, MDen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.