What’s in your sample closet? A cross-sectional study to quantify the number of expired samples and to evaluate novelty and usefulness of sample closet medications

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/281155
Title:
What’s in your sample closet? A cross-sectional study to quantify the number of expired samples and to evaluate novelty and usefulness of sample closet medications
Author:
Evans, Kari
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
Mar-2013
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2013 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Background Many physicians dispense drug samples in their offices. In general, evidence suggests that drug samples provide minimal benefit to patients. Objective and Hypothesis To quantify the number of expired sample closet medications and to analyze the medications most commonly found for their novelty and usefulness. We hypothesized that the medications found in local sample closets will often be expired and will not be novel or useful. Methods We inventoried ten sample closets in primary care clinics. We quantified the number of expired medications and analyzed the 23 medications found in seven or more closets. To assess novelty, we determined if the sample medication: had a new mechanism of action, had a generic on market with same mechanism of action, and had a generic medication on market for the same indication. To assess usefulness, we determined if the sample medication had improved patient oriented outcomes, safety, and tolerability. We noted the cost of a one-month supply for the typical starting dose of each sample medication. Results Of the 12,581 drug packages and boxes we inventoried, 14% of were expired. Ninety-six percent (n=22) of sample closet medications had a generic medication on the market for the same indication and 74% (n=17) had a generic medication on the market with the same mechanism. Only 3 medications (13%) had evidence of superior patient oriented outcomes when compared to other medications for the same indication. Six medications (26%) demonstrated superior safety and tolerability. Only one medication (4%) was recommended as first line therapy in an evidence-based guideline. The mean cost for a one month supply of a typical starting dose was 178 dollars. Significance and Conclusions. Sample closet medications are often expired, have limited novelty and usefulness, and are expensive. The widespread use of sample medications should be re-examined.
MeSH Subjects:
Physicians, Primary Care; Prescription Drugs
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
Brown, Steven, MD

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleWhat’s in your sample closet? A cross-sectional study to quantify the number of expired samples and to evaluate novelty and usefulness of sample closet medicationsen_US
dc.contributor.authorEvans, Karien_US
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen_US
dc.date.issued2013-03-
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2013 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.description.abstractBackground Many physicians dispense drug samples in their offices. In general, evidence suggests that drug samples provide minimal benefit to patients. Objective and Hypothesis To quantify the number of expired sample closet medications and to analyze the medications most commonly found for their novelty and usefulness. We hypothesized that the medications found in local sample closets will often be expired and will not be novel or useful. Methods We inventoried ten sample closets in primary care clinics. We quantified the number of expired medications and analyzed the 23 medications found in seven or more closets. To assess novelty, we determined if the sample medication: had a new mechanism of action, had a generic on market with same mechanism of action, and had a generic medication on market for the same indication. To assess usefulness, we determined if the sample medication had improved patient oriented outcomes, safety, and tolerability. We noted the cost of a one-month supply for the typical starting dose of each sample medication. Results Of the 12,581 drug packages and boxes we inventoried, 14% of were expired. Ninety-six percent (n=22) of sample closet medications had a generic medication on the market for the same indication and 74% (n=17) had a generic medication on the market with the same mechanism. Only 3 medications (13%) had evidence of superior patient oriented outcomes when compared to other medications for the same indication. Six medications (26%) demonstrated superior safety and tolerability. Only one medication (4%) was recommended as first line therapy in an evidence-based guideline. The mean cost for a one month supply of a typical starting dose was 178 dollars. Significance and Conclusions. Sample closet medications are often expired, have limited novelty and usefulness, and are expensive. The widespread use of sample medications should be re-examined.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.subject.meshPhysicians, Primary Careen_US
dc.subject.meshPrescription Drugsen_US
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorBrown, Steven, MDen_US
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