Aravaipa: Apache peoplehood and the legacy of particular geography and historical experience

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280792
Title:
Aravaipa: Apache peoplehood and the legacy of particular geography and historical experience
Author:
Record, Ian Wilson
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study seeks to articulate in the broadest of terms the cultural legacy of Arapa (the ancestral territory encompassing Aravaipa Canyon and the confluence of Aravaipa Creek and the San Pedro River) as seen through the eyes of a group of its Western Apache descendants. It humbly attempts to sketch the basic outlines of the contemporary relationship between this place and those Apaches who possess a working cultural knowledge of it. Specifically, it demonstrates that the experiential exercise of maintaining place is a fundamentally personal one dependent on its individual actors to interact with it and in the process fulfill their obligation to enliven its history, stories and lessons anew. Finally, it illustrates how the unique historical experience emanating from Arapa has no bounds in time or meaning, proving that events of the past--namely the Camp Grant massacre, which precipitated the Apaches' forced exodus from that place--affect Apache culture and society in the present. This study enlists as its primary analytical lens the "peoplehood" matrix--the notion that indigenous peoples in this country (and elsewhere) possess a unique, place-bound sense of group and community identity shaped by lived experiences that sets them apart, both individually and collectively, from dominant society.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
American Studies.; History, United States.; Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; American Indian Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Holm, Tom

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAravaipa: Apache peoplehood and the legacy of particular geography and historical experienceen_US
dc.creatorRecord, Ian Wilsonen_US
dc.contributor.authorRecord, Ian Wilsonen_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study seeks to articulate in the broadest of terms the cultural legacy of Arapa (the ancestral territory encompassing Aravaipa Canyon and the confluence of Aravaipa Creek and the San Pedro River) as seen through the eyes of a group of its Western Apache descendants. It humbly attempts to sketch the basic outlines of the contemporary relationship between this place and those Apaches who possess a working cultural knowledge of it. Specifically, it demonstrates that the experiential exercise of maintaining place is a fundamentally personal one dependent on its individual actors to interact with it and in the process fulfill their obligation to enliven its history, stories and lessons anew. Finally, it illustrates how the unique historical experience emanating from Arapa has no bounds in time or meaning, proving that events of the past--namely the Camp Grant massacre, which precipitated the Apaches' forced exodus from that place--affect Apache culture and society in the present. This study enlists as its primary analytical lens the "peoplehood" matrix--the notion that indigenous peoples in this country (and elsewhere) possess a unique, place-bound sense of group and community identity shaped by lived experiences that sets them apart, both individually and collectively, from dominant society.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAmerican Studies.en_US
dc.subjectHistory, United States.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHolm, Tomen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3165790en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b47210394en_US
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