Integrated agriculture and aquaculture for sustainable food production

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280769
Title:
Integrated agriculture and aquaculture for sustainable food production
Author:
King, Chad Eric
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
As we have come to depend on aquaculture to supplement natural fisheries, intensive culture methods have increased production. Accompanying environmental damage--non-point source pollution, loss of biodiversity and struggle for water--has offset food and financial gains. Problems surrounding food production are amplified in arid lands, as the potential of irrigated agriculture is weighed against the value of water. Through the following research, I studied integration of aquaculture and agriculture through multiple uses of water and nutrients, to reduce environmental impacts. When managed properly, integration can provide multiple cash crops, increased food and fiber production with reduced inputs. Integration allows for groundwater and nutrients in water and solid waste to be reused. Shrimp farms in Arizona use low-salinity ground water from aquifers for shrimp ponds and agricultural irrigation. On one of these farms, effluent is reused for irrigation of olive trees and other field crops. In Chapter 3, I described an experiment designed to quantify changes in the height of olive trees due to irrigation with shrimp effluent. Trees receiving effluent grew an average of 61.0 cm over the two-year experiment, 70.4 cm with fertilizer and 48.4 cm in the well water treatment. No negative effects due to effluent irrigation were found, while increases in water use efficiency were realized by producing two crops with the same irrigation water. Multiple uses of water are also possible in smaller scale agriculture systems. I performed a financial analysis of a small-scale aquaponics system, integrated hydroponics and aquaculture, in Chapter 4. Biological viability of such systems is clear. By building and managing this system for five months, I examined economic viability, by analyzing annual costs and revenue. Calculating net present value showed that the system was not financially viable unless labor costs were excluded. Financial returns were between 3,794 and 10,640 over six years. In five months, this system produced 181.4 kg of food, with fish feed, iron and water as the only inputs. This study showed potential for using small-scale aquaponics as a hobby, in schools, and as a tool for agricultural economics education, but not as a business opportunity.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Environmental Sciences.; Agriculture, Fisheries and Aquaculture.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Soil, Water and Environmental Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Fitzsimmons, Kevin

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleIntegrated agriculture and aquaculture for sustainable food productionen_US
dc.creatorKing, Chad Ericen_US
dc.contributor.authorKing, Chad Ericen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAs we have come to depend on aquaculture to supplement natural fisheries, intensive culture methods have increased production. Accompanying environmental damage--non-point source pollution, loss of biodiversity and struggle for water--has offset food and financial gains. Problems surrounding food production are amplified in arid lands, as the potential of irrigated agriculture is weighed against the value of water. Through the following research, I studied integration of aquaculture and agriculture through multiple uses of water and nutrients, to reduce environmental impacts. When managed properly, integration can provide multiple cash crops, increased food and fiber production with reduced inputs. Integration allows for groundwater and nutrients in water and solid waste to be reused. Shrimp farms in Arizona use low-salinity ground water from aquifers for shrimp ponds and agricultural irrigation. On one of these farms, effluent is reused for irrigation of olive trees and other field crops. In Chapter 3, I described an experiment designed to quantify changes in the height of olive trees due to irrigation with shrimp effluent. Trees receiving effluent grew an average of 61.0 cm over the two-year experiment, 70.4 cm with fertilizer and 48.4 cm in the well water treatment. No negative effects due to effluent irrigation were found, while increases in water use efficiency were realized by producing two crops with the same irrigation water. Multiple uses of water are also possible in smaller scale agriculture systems. I performed a financial analysis of a small-scale aquaponics system, integrated hydroponics and aquaculture, in Chapter 4. Biological viability of such systems is clear. By building and managing this system for five months, I examined economic viability, by analyzing annual costs and revenue. Calculating net present value showed that the system was not financially viable unless labor costs were excluded. Financial returns were between 3,794 and 10,640 over six years. In five months, this system produced 181.4 kg of food, with fish feed, iron and water as the only inputs. This study showed potential for using small-scale aquaponics as a hobby, in schools, and as a tool for agricultural economics education, but not as a business opportunity.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciences.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Fisheries and Aquaculture.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSoil, Water and Environmental Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFitzsimmons, Kevinen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3158213en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b48137856en_US
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