Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280759
Title:
Modeling and analysis of ion-exchanged photonic devices
Author:
West, Brian Robert
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Photonic devices fabricated by ion exchange in glass have evolved to the point where conventional assumptions of waveguide symmetry and mutual independence are no longer valid. For example, during field-assisted ion exchange processes, the nonhomogeneity of ionic conductivity in the vicinity of the waveguide results in a time-dependent perturbation of the electric field. Previous studies have shown that the depth and vertical symmetry of buried waveguides are noticeably affected by the field perturbation. This Dissertation describes an advanced modeling tool for guided-wave devices based on ion-exchanged glass waveguides. A genetic algorithm is proposed to determine the physical parameters that drive the ion exchange process. The diffusion equation describing binary ion exchange is solved numerically. The effect of field perturbation, due not only to the conductivity profile, but also to the proximity of adjacent waveguides or partial masking during a field-assisted burial, is accounted for. A semivectorial finite difference method is then employed to determine the modal properties of the waveguide structures. The model is validated by comparison with a fabricated waveguide containing a Bragg grating. The modeled waveguides are utilized in the design of a multimode interference (MMI) device. A novel genetic algorithm-based design methodology is developed to circumvent issues with the commonly used self-imaging theory that arise when the MMI device operates in the regime of weak guiding. A combination of semivectorial finite difference modeling in two transverse dimensions and mode propagation analysis (MPA) in the propagation direction is used to evaluate the merit of each trial design. Two examples are provided of a 1 x 4 power splitter, which show considerable improvement in power imbalance and polarization dependent loss over that obtained by self-imaging theory.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Physics, Optics.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Optical Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Honkanen, Seppo

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleModeling and analysis of ion-exchanged photonic devicesen_US
dc.creatorWest, Brian Roberten_US
dc.contributor.authorWest, Brian Roberten_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPhotonic devices fabricated by ion exchange in glass have evolved to the point where conventional assumptions of waveguide symmetry and mutual independence are no longer valid. For example, during field-assisted ion exchange processes, the nonhomogeneity of ionic conductivity in the vicinity of the waveguide results in a time-dependent perturbation of the electric field. Previous studies have shown that the depth and vertical symmetry of buried waveguides are noticeably affected by the field perturbation. This Dissertation describes an advanced modeling tool for guided-wave devices based on ion-exchanged glass waveguides. A genetic algorithm is proposed to determine the physical parameters that drive the ion exchange process. The diffusion equation describing binary ion exchange is solved numerically. The effect of field perturbation, due not only to the conductivity profile, but also to the proximity of adjacent waveguides or partial masking during a field-assisted burial, is accounted for. A semivectorial finite difference method is then employed to determine the modal properties of the waveguide structures. The model is validated by comparison with a fabricated waveguide containing a Bragg grating. The modeled waveguides are utilized in the design of a multimode interference (MMI) device. A novel genetic algorithm-based design methodology is developed to circumvent issues with the commonly used self-imaging theory that arise when the MMI device operates in the regime of weak guiding. A combination of semivectorial finite difference modeling in two transverse dimensions and mode propagation analysis (MPA) in the propagation direction is used to evaluate the merit of each trial design. Two examples are provided of a 1 x 4 power splitter, which show considerable improvement in power imbalance and polarization dependent loss over that obtained by self-imaging theory.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPhysics, Optics.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHonkanen, Seppoen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3158167en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b48137583en_US
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