Sex-role, attributional style, and career choices: A cross-cultural analysis

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280755
Title:
Sex-role, attributional style, and career choices: A cross-cultural analysis
Author:
Szabo, Zsuzsanna Rozalia
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In the contemporary society choice of career is sex-stereotyped. There are more females in educational and nursing careers, and there are more males in engineering and science careers. Females and males perceive their roles in the society in a sex-stereotyped way and they try to fit into culturally appropriate sex-roles. People make causal attributions for different situations in life and think and behave according to the causal attributions they make. The research question of this dissertation asks if sex-role and attributional style affect career choices, and if the answer is different across cultures. Two studies were concerned with the relationship between sex-role, attributional style, and career choices at college and high school levels in two different cultures (the United States and Romania). Comparisons were made also between females in single-sex high school and coeducational high schools. A third study determined the changes in career choices following attributional retraining. Results from the studies show that career choices are sex-stereotyped and sex-roles influence choice of career in both cultures. The sex-stereotypical choice of careers is more evident in Romania. Females in single-sex education schools report more adaptive sex-roles and attributional styles, and they choose more diverse career fields than females in coeducational schools. Attributional retraining is related to changes in career choices.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Social.; Education, Guidance and Counseling.; Education, Educational Psychology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Educational Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Streitmatter, Janice L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSex-role, attributional style, and career choices: A cross-cultural analysisen_US
dc.creatorSzabo, Zsuzsanna Rozaliaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSzabo, Zsuzsanna Rozaliaen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn the contemporary society choice of career is sex-stereotyped. There are more females in educational and nursing careers, and there are more males in engineering and science careers. Females and males perceive their roles in the society in a sex-stereotyped way and they try to fit into culturally appropriate sex-roles. People make causal attributions for different situations in life and think and behave according to the causal attributions they make. The research question of this dissertation asks if sex-role and attributional style affect career choices, and if the answer is different across cultures. Two studies were concerned with the relationship between sex-role, attributional style, and career choices at college and high school levels in two different cultures (the United States and Romania). Comparisons were made also between females in single-sex high school and coeducational high schools. A third study determined the changes in career choices following attributional retraining. Results from the studies show that career choices are sex-stereotyped and sex-roles influence choice of career in both cultures. The sex-stereotypical choice of careers is more evident in Romania. Females in single-sex education schools report more adaptive sex-roles and attributional styles, and they choose more diverse career fields than females in coeducational schools. Attributional retraining is related to changes in career choices.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Social.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Guidance and Counseling.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Educational Psychology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorStreitmatter, Janice L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3158161en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b48137637en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.