The imaginary audience, the personal fable, and a rival hypothesis: An alternative explanation for behavior typical of adolescence

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280750
Title:
The imaginary audience, the personal fable, and a rival hypothesis: An alternative explanation for behavior typical of adolescence
Author:
Siegal, Jason T.
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Many explanations of young adolescent behavior are based on processes specific to young adolescents. This implies adults and other organisms do not exhibit behaviors exhibited by young adolescents. Based on Tolman's model of purposive behavior, young adolescents are argued to follow the same behavioral patterns as other beings. Young adolescents are argued to be hypersensitive to their social environment, as indicated by the imaginary audience, but based on a different rationale. Further, it is argued that adolescents may take great risks, but not due to false perceptions of invulnerability. Based on Tolman and Erikson's work, it is argued that individuals experience a state of disruption when faced with changing social reality and negative expectancy violations. Disruption is argued to lead to behaviors indicative of a "typical adolescent." The sample for this study includes 214 college students ages 18 to 21. College students were chosen as the sample to ensure if the hypotheses were supported, processes or events specific to young adolescence could not be the attributed cause. The respondents attended either a Southwestern University (n = 115) or a Northeastern College (n = 99). Results, obtained via cross-sectional survey, primarily support the proposed rationale and hypotheses. College-student respondents, overall, were significantly more likely to express a willingness to risk physical pain the greater their self-reported need to obtain the rewards associated with the risk. Respondents were also more sensitive to information depending on their desired goal-state and their level of satiation regarding their desired goal-state. Results also support the prediction that respondents would be less able to separate others' concerns from their own when the topic of interest was of self-importance than when the issue was not. Other findings reveal individuals learn more about relevant than irrelevant information and that they exhibit greater stress and anxiety, and less self-esteem and stability of self when in a state of disruption. These findings argue a new approach be taken when interpreting adolescent behavior.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Behavioral.; Education, Educational Psychology.; Psychology, Developmental.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Educational Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sabers, Darrell L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe imaginary audience, the personal fable, and a rival hypothesis: An alternative explanation for behavior typical of adolescenceen_US
dc.creatorSiegal, Jason T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSiegal, Jason T.en_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMany explanations of young adolescent behavior are based on processes specific to young adolescents. This implies adults and other organisms do not exhibit behaviors exhibited by young adolescents. Based on Tolman's model of purposive behavior, young adolescents are argued to follow the same behavioral patterns as other beings. Young adolescents are argued to be hypersensitive to their social environment, as indicated by the imaginary audience, but based on a different rationale. Further, it is argued that adolescents may take great risks, but not due to false perceptions of invulnerability. Based on Tolman and Erikson's work, it is argued that individuals experience a state of disruption when faced with changing social reality and negative expectancy violations. Disruption is argued to lead to behaviors indicative of a "typical adolescent." The sample for this study includes 214 college students ages 18 to 21. College students were chosen as the sample to ensure if the hypotheses were supported, processes or events specific to young adolescence could not be the attributed cause. The respondents attended either a Southwestern University (n = 115) or a Northeastern College (n = 99). Results, obtained via cross-sectional survey, primarily support the proposed rationale and hypotheses. College-student respondents, overall, were significantly more likely to express a willingness to risk physical pain the greater their self-reported need to obtain the rewards associated with the risk. Respondents were also more sensitive to information depending on their desired goal-state and their level of satiation regarding their desired goal-state. Results also support the prediction that respondents would be less able to separate others' concerns from their own when the topic of interest was of self-importance than when the issue was not. Other findings reveal individuals learn more about relevant than irrelevant information and that they exhibit greater stress and anxiety, and less self-esteem and stability of self when in a state of disruption. These findings argue a new approach be taken when interpreting adolescent behavior.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Behavioral.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Educational Psychology.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Developmental.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSabers, Darrell L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3158156en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b48137650en_US
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