Growth form evolution in Adenia (Passifloraceae) and a model of the evolution of succulence

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280706
Title:
Growth form evolution in Adenia (Passifloraceae) and a model of the evolution of succulence
Author:
Hearn, David John
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The architecture of a plant is intimately tied to its fitness. Knowledge of the processes and patterns of growth form evolution can therefore contribute to a richer understanding of plant evolution. The genus Adenia (Passifloraceae) of ca. 100 species is an Old World lineage in which growth form radiated. I constructed a molecular phylogeny of the group, analyzed the stem and tuber anatomy of over half the species, and investigated patterns of growth form evolution in a phylogenetic context. I also described four new species and a new combination. Predictions based on evolutionary developmental models of growth form evolution were tested in Adenia, and one of them, the homeotic switch hypothesis, was tested throughout the eudicots. The switch hypothesis claims that the storage tissue of tubers and stems results from a common developmental origin. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that growth form transitions were frequent, and anatomical studies revealed traits that are associated with each growth form; moreover, traits are shared between tubers and succulent stems as predicted by the switch hypothesis. As expected, tuberous plants and succulents are also closely related across the eudicots. The switch hypothesis is substantiated in Adenia and the eudicots as a whole.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Biostatistics.; Biology, Botany.; Biology, Genetics.; Biology, Plant Physiology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McDade, Lucinda A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleGrowth form evolution in Adenia (Passifloraceae) and a model of the evolution of succulenceen_US
dc.creatorHearn, David Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorHearn, David Johnen_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe architecture of a plant is intimately tied to its fitness. Knowledge of the processes and patterns of growth form evolution can therefore contribute to a richer understanding of plant evolution. The genus Adenia (Passifloraceae) of ca. 100 species is an Old World lineage in which growth form radiated. I constructed a molecular phylogeny of the group, analyzed the stem and tuber anatomy of over half the species, and investigated patterns of growth form evolution in a phylogenetic context. I also described four new species and a new combination. Predictions based on evolutionary developmental models of growth form evolution were tested in Adenia, and one of them, the homeotic switch hypothesis, was tested throughout the eudicots. The switch hypothesis claims that the storage tissue of tubers and stems results from a common developmental origin. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that growth form transitions were frequent, and anatomical studies revealed traits that are associated with each growth form; moreover, traits are shared between tubers and succulent stems as predicted by the switch hypothesis. As expected, tuberous plants and succulents are also closely related across the eudicots. The switch hypothesis is substantiated in Adenia and the eudicots as a whole.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Biostatistics.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Botany.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Genetics.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Plant Physiology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEcology and Evolutionary Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMcDade, Lucinda A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3158103en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b48101187en_US
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