Breaking the silence in classroom participation: A study of a regular classroom and a computer-mediated setting

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280689
Title:
Breaking the silence in classroom participation: A study of a regular classroom and a computer-mediated setting
Author:
Cunningham, Debra L.
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This qualitative study of classroom processes focuses on the roles students play in two different environments, a regular classroom and an anonymous, collaborative, technological environment using GroupSystems. As students from an urban high school engaged in a brainstorming session about complex, ethical issues, they participated differently in each setting. The research questions that this study addresses are: Given a discussion of complex, ethical issues, what is the nature of classroom participation roles? In addition, in what ways are participation roles in a regular classroom structure different from a collaborative, technological environment? Furthermore, in each environment, how do ethnically diverse students participate in discussions of complex, ethical issues, as defined by their participation roles? Then to view gender issues in each environment, how do male and female students participate in discussions of complex, ethical issues, as defined by their participation roles? An analysis of these questions provides a deeper understanding of the roles students take in a classroom discussion. In addition, it provides similarities and differences between such discussions in a regular classroom versus an online setting. The insights provided in this study may contribute to a better understanding for teaching and teacher education in constructing activities and environments that support student voice, equity, and active participation in society as a whole.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Speech Communication.; Education, Secondary.; Education, Technology of.; Education, Curriculum and Instruction.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Teaching and Teacher Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Carter, Kathy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleBreaking the silence in classroom participation: A study of a regular classroom and a computer-mediated settingen_US
dc.creatorCunningham, Debra L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCunningham, Debra L.en_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis qualitative study of classroom processes focuses on the roles students play in two different environments, a regular classroom and an anonymous, collaborative, technological environment using GroupSystems. As students from an urban high school engaged in a brainstorming session about complex, ethical issues, they participated differently in each setting. The research questions that this study addresses are: Given a discussion of complex, ethical issues, what is the nature of classroom participation roles? In addition, in what ways are participation roles in a regular classroom structure different from a collaborative, technological environment? Furthermore, in each environment, how do ethnically diverse students participate in discussions of complex, ethical issues, as defined by their participation roles? Then to view gender issues in each environment, how do male and female students participate in discussions of complex, ethical issues, as defined by their participation roles? An analysis of these questions provides a deeper understanding of the roles students take in a classroom discussion. In addition, it provides similarities and differences between such discussions in a regular classroom versus an online setting. The insights provided in this study may contribute to a better understanding for teaching and teacher education in constructing activities and environments that support student voice, equity, and active participation in society as a whole.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSpeech Communication.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Secondary.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Technology of.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Curriculum and Instruction.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTeaching and Teacher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCarter, Kathyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3158083en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b47907010en_US
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