Wildfire and climate interactions across the Southwest United States

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280688
Title:
Wildfire and climate interactions across the Southwest United States
Author:
Crimmins, Michael Alan
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Variability in climate and wildfire activity are inextricably linked through complex and often poorly understood processes. The studies presented in this dissertation examine fire-climate relationships across the southwestern United States at different temporal and spatial scales. Collectively, they identify that low-frequency and high-frequency changes in climatic variables important to wildfire are connected through teleconnection patterns originating in the tropical and extratropical Pacific Ocean (El Nino-Southern Oscillation [ENSO] and Pacific Decadal Oscillation [PDO]). Variability in precipitation years prior to a wildfire season appears to affect the overall number of fires and total area burned by either promoting or limiting the growth of fine fuels and also controlling moisture levels in heavy fuels. The same mechanisms (ENSO & PDO) that play a role in precipitation variability across the Southwest also appear to modulate the frequency of extreme fire weather events during the spring fire season. Identifying links between high and low frequency climatic variables important to wildfire variability provides additional insight into the complex mechanisms that link wildfire and climate. The results of this dissertation will aid in improving wildfire planning efforts that extend seasons to decades into the future.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Physical Geography.; Geophysics.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Geography and Regional Development
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Comrie, Andrew C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleWildfire and climate interactions across the Southwest United Statesen_US
dc.creatorCrimmins, Michael Alanen_US
dc.contributor.authorCrimmins, Michael Alanen_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractVariability in climate and wildfire activity are inextricably linked through complex and often poorly understood processes. The studies presented in this dissertation examine fire-climate relationships across the southwestern United States at different temporal and spatial scales. Collectively, they identify that low-frequency and high-frequency changes in climatic variables important to wildfire are connected through teleconnection patterns originating in the tropical and extratropical Pacific Ocean (El Nino-Southern Oscillation [ENSO] and Pacific Decadal Oscillation [PDO]). Variability in precipitation years prior to a wildfire season appears to affect the overall number of fires and total area burned by either promoting or limiting the growth of fine fuels and also controlling moisture levels in heavy fuels. The same mechanisms (ENSO & PDO) that play a role in precipitation variability across the Southwest also appear to modulate the frequency of extreme fire weather events during the spring fire season. Identifying links between high and low frequency climatic variables important to wildfire variability provides additional insight into the complex mechanisms that link wildfire and climate. The results of this dissertation will aid in improving wildfire planning efforts that extend seasons to decades into the future.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPhysical Geography.en_US
dc.subjectGeophysics.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeography and Regional Developmenten_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorComrie, Andrew C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3158082en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b47907009en_US
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