Joyce Mansour's poetics: A discourse of plurality by a second-generation surrealist poet

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280687
Title:
Joyce Mansour's poetics: A discourse of plurality by a second-generation surrealist poet
Author:
Bachmann, Dominique Groslier
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Interest in Joyce Mansour has centered mostly on the ambiguity and the lack of "subjective identity" in her poetic works. This dissertation proposes to investigate that notion and demonstrates that Mansour's discourse is that of a woman poet's assertive, complex, and universal voice in the realm of post-surrealism. Chapter 1 introduces Mansour's poetic corpus, and provides the theoretical approach of our study in view of various critics' interpretations of Joyce Mansour's lack of "subjective identity," as well as other recent, more positive readings of her literary production. Chapter 2 provides pertinent information about the surrealist movement and its founder, Andre Breton. It also considers the role of women and their artistic contribution to the movement. Chapter 3 expounds on the uniqueness of Mansour's assertive voice via the technique of poetic-collage, and highlights the function of eroticism as a liberating force. Georges Bataille's study of Eroticism in literature and surrealism contributes to our study. This chapter also recognizes Mansour's use of Egyptian myths as one of the pillar of her narrative structure. It will show that the poet favors a language of self-regeneration in which the dichotomies between light versus dark, and life versus death are underscored. Chapter 4 explores the role of archetypal images in Mansour's poetry. While the Mother archetypal images demonstrate the universality of her poetry, the Jungian concept of a collective unconscious further clarifies Mansour's poetic discourse. An analysis of archetypes in women literature contributes to the identification of other archetypes, (The Devil, God, and Aphrodite) present in Mansour's discourse. Chapter 5 acknowledges Mansour's pronominal gender play. Monique Wittig's approach on gender theories and our textual concordances of Mansour's poems will provide the underlying theory for discussion. The conclusion supports the notion that Mansour's discourse of plurality is that of a woman who, fearful of humanity's inevitable fate, confronted death through a literary exuberance that has become her identity and personal signature. Our conclusion reveals the existence of two texts that are not part of Mansour's published collection. These texts contribute to a better understanding of Mansour's literary contribution.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Literature, Modern.; Literature, Middle Eastern.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; French and Italian
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ariew, Robert

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleJoyce Mansour's poetics: A discourse of plurality by a second-generation surrealist poeten_US
dc.creatorBachmann, Dominique Groslieren_US
dc.contributor.authorBachmann, Dominique Groslieren_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractInterest in Joyce Mansour has centered mostly on the ambiguity and the lack of "subjective identity" in her poetic works. This dissertation proposes to investigate that notion and demonstrates that Mansour's discourse is that of a woman poet's assertive, complex, and universal voice in the realm of post-surrealism. Chapter 1 introduces Mansour's poetic corpus, and provides the theoretical approach of our study in view of various critics' interpretations of Joyce Mansour's lack of "subjective identity," as well as other recent, more positive readings of her literary production. Chapter 2 provides pertinent information about the surrealist movement and its founder, Andre Breton. It also considers the role of women and their artistic contribution to the movement. Chapter 3 expounds on the uniqueness of Mansour's assertive voice via the technique of poetic-collage, and highlights the function of eroticism as a liberating force. Georges Bataille's study of Eroticism in literature and surrealism contributes to our study. This chapter also recognizes Mansour's use of Egyptian myths as one of the pillar of her narrative structure. It will show that the poet favors a language of self-regeneration in which the dichotomies between light versus dark, and life versus death are underscored. Chapter 4 explores the role of archetypal images in Mansour's poetry. While the Mother archetypal images demonstrate the universality of her poetry, the Jungian concept of a collective unconscious further clarifies Mansour's poetic discourse. An analysis of archetypes in women literature contributes to the identification of other archetypes, (The Devil, God, and Aphrodite) present in Mansour's discourse. Chapter 5 acknowledges Mansour's pronominal gender play. Monique Wittig's approach on gender theories and our textual concordances of Mansour's poems will provide the underlying theory for discussion. The conclusion supports the notion that Mansour's discourse of plurality is that of a woman who, fearful of humanity's inevitable fate, confronted death through a literary exuberance that has become her identity and personal signature. Our conclusion reveals the existence of two texts that are not part of Mansour's published collection. These texts contribute to a better understanding of Mansour's literary contribution.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectLiterature, Modern.en_US
dc.subjectLiterature, Middle Eastern.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFrench and Italianen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorAriew, Roberten_US
dc.identifier.proquest3016460en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41889824en_US
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