Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280684
Title:
State partisan interventions in international conflicts
Author:
Corbetta, Renato
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The dissertation explores the phenomenon of joining behavior--non-neutral interventions by third party states in interstate conflicts. The opportunity and willingness theoretical framework (Most and Starr 1989) is used to develop a model of third party intervention that integrates simultaneously intervention decision, alignment choices, and selection of specific intervention techniques. Within the general model of third party intervention, two models of third party's preference formation--a rational choice and a homophily-based model--are compared. The models are empirically tested with newly collected data on interventions in interstate disputes for the 1946-2001 period. The data expand current knowledge on third states' activities by including information on non-military--diplomatic and economic--intervention techniques. Opportunity factors are found to predict effectively third parties' intervention; while willingness shapes alignment decisions and selection of intervention techniques. Strategic and homophily-based similarities with the state supported in a conflict and dissimilarities with the state being antagonized are found to matter equally in shaping third parties' decisions. Methodologically, this study addresses a variety of selection issues present in current research on joining behavior. Theoretically, it speaks to a variety of international relations issues, such as balance-of-power and bandwagoning, spatial diffusion of conflict, foreign policy substitutability and decision-making, and alliance formation and reliability.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Political Science, International Law and Relations.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Political Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dixon, William J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleState partisan interventions in international conflictsen_US
dc.creatorCorbetta, Renatoen_US
dc.contributor.authorCorbetta, Renatoen_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe dissertation explores the phenomenon of joining behavior--non-neutral interventions by third party states in interstate conflicts. The opportunity and willingness theoretical framework (Most and Starr 1989) is used to develop a model of third party intervention that integrates simultaneously intervention decision, alignment choices, and selection of specific intervention techniques. Within the general model of third party intervention, two models of third party's preference formation--a rational choice and a homophily-based model--are compared. The models are empirically tested with newly collected data on interventions in interstate disputes for the 1946-2001 period. The data expand current knowledge on third states' activities by including information on non-military--diplomatic and economic--intervention techniques. Opportunity factors are found to predict effectively third parties' intervention; while willingness shapes alignment decisions and selection of intervention techniques. Strategic and homophily-based similarities with the state supported in a conflict and dissimilarities with the state being antagonized are found to matter equally in shaping third parties' decisions. Methodologically, this study addresses a variety of selection issues present in current research on joining behavior. Theoretically, it speaks to a variety of international relations issues, such as balance-of-power and bandwagoning, spatial diffusion of conflict, foreign policy substitutability and decision-making, and alliance formation and reliability.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, International Law and Relations.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDixon, William J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3158080en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b47906960en_US
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