Training athletic trainers in the delivery of sport psychology rehabilitation interventions

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280648
Title:
Training athletic trainers in the delivery of sport psychology rehabilitation interventions
Author:
Scherzer, Carrie Beth
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In recent years, much has been learned about the beneficial role of psychological skills (e.g., goal setting, stress management) in rehabilitation from injury. Several authors (e.g., Cramer Roh & Perna, 2000; Misasi, Richmond, & Kemler, 1998) suggest that athletic trainers are ideal to teach athletes psychological skills. The most effective way to integrate psychological skills in rehabilitation may be to have athletic trainers work with athletes on both the physical and psychological recovery from injury. Previous research by Roepke (1993) suggested that when athletic trainers are educated about sport psychology rehabilitation interventions, they tend to become proficient in the use of such interventions, and they consider the interventions effective. The primary goal of this study was to determine whether athletic trainers incorporate psychological skills in their work with injured athletes after receiving training in using such skills. Another goal was to assess changes in athletic trainers' attitudes (e.g., importance) with regard to incorporating psychological skills in rehabilitation. A third goal was to determine whether a brief intervention program training athletic trainers in the delivery of sport psychology rehabilitation interventions increases trainers' confidence in using such skills. Other goals related to athletes' perceptions were unable to be tested due to insufficient data. Due to low enrollment and completion rates for the study (N = 8), an additional purpose became soliciting athletic trainers to find out why they did not participate. Responses to this survey by athletic trainers and athletic training students ( N = 25) indicated that time constraints were a primary reason for non-participation. Those who did complete the study reported an increase in perceived skill level relative to using psychological techniques with injured athletes, and also reported that they thought, overall, that they used the techniques more. This latter statement was not corroborated with the data from daily reports, but does demonstrate a perceived shift in behavior. There was no change in athletic trainers' perception of the importance of psychological skills following the educational program. Low enrollment and limited compliance with the research protocol weakened the findings of this study. Implications for further work, including several alternate designs, are discussed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Rehabilitation and Therapy.; Education, Adult and Continuing.; Health Sciences, Recreation.; Psychology, Clinical.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Williams, Jean M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleTraining athletic trainers in the delivery of sport psychology rehabilitation interventionsen_US
dc.creatorScherzer, Carrie Bethen_US
dc.contributor.authorScherzer, Carrie Bethen_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, much has been learned about the beneficial role of psychological skills (e.g., goal setting, stress management) in rehabilitation from injury. Several authors (e.g., Cramer Roh & Perna, 2000; Misasi, Richmond, & Kemler, 1998) suggest that athletic trainers are ideal to teach athletes psychological skills. The most effective way to integrate psychological skills in rehabilitation may be to have athletic trainers work with athletes on both the physical and psychological recovery from injury. Previous research by Roepke (1993) suggested that when athletic trainers are educated about sport psychology rehabilitation interventions, they tend to become proficient in the use of such interventions, and they consider the interventions effective. The primary goal of this study was to determine whether athletic trainers incorporate psychological skills in their work with injured athletes after receiving training in using such skills. Another goal was to assess changes in athletic trainers' attitudes (e.g., importance) with regard to incorporating psychological skills in rehabilitation. A third goal was to determine whether a brief intervention program training athletic trainers in the delivery of sport psychology rehabilitation interventions increases trainers' confidence in using such skills. Other goals related to athletes' perceptions were unable to be tested due to insufficient data. Due to low enrollment and completion rates for the study (N = 8), an additional purpose became soliciting athletic trainers to find out why they did not participate. Responses to this survey by athletic trainers and athletic training students ( N = 25) indicated that time constraints were a primary reason for non-participation. Those who did complete the study reported an increase in perceived skill level relative to using psychological techniques with injured athletes, and also reported that they thought, overall, that they used the techniques more. This latter statement was not corroborated with the data from daily reports, but does demonstrate a perceived shift in behavior. There was no change in athletic trainers' perception of the importance of psychological skills following the educational program. Low enrollment and limited compliance with the research protocol weakened the findings of this study. Implications for further work, including several alternate designs, are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Rehabilitation and Therapy.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Adult and Continuing.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Recreation.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWilliams, Jean M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3145124en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b47210254en_US
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