Personality and electrocortical correlates of extreme belief regarding ESP

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280636
Title:
Personality and electrocortical correlates of extreme belief regarding ESP
Author:
Nelson, Lonnie A.
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Forty participants from an introductory Psychology course were recruited based upon their self-reported beliefs in ESP (High, Medium, Low). Participants answered a packet of self report questionnaires, then underwent electroencephalographic (EEG) recording during eyes open and eyes closed resting baseline. Participants then completed "traditional" and "novelty enhanced" formats, of a multimodal biofield detection battery and a computerized forced-choice precognition task. Results showed no evidence of precognition for any belief level group, or either task format. Biofield detection accuracy was significantly above chance expectation for 2 of the 6 modalities tested, and correlated with self reported "energy sensitivity". Belief in ESP was found to be psychologically related to higher levels of belief in other "spiritual experiences", lower levels of cynicism and rigidity, and increased sense of coherence. EEG findings indicated that strong belief and strong skepticism of ESP were associated with increased frontal asymmetry scores, and that moderate degrees of belief were associated with negative frontal asymmetry scores during eyes open baseline recording. Suggestions for future research are provided.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Clinical.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Schwartz, Gary E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titlePersonality and electrocortical correlates of extreme belief regarding ESPen_US
dc.creatorNelson, Lonnie A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNelson, Lonnie A.en_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractForty participants from an introductory Psychology course were recruited based upon their self-reported beliefs in ESP (High, Medium, Low). Participants answered a packet of self report questionnaires, then underwent electroencephalographic (EEG) recording during eyes open and eyes closed resting baseline. Participants then completed "traditional" and "novelty enhanced" formats, of a multimodal biofield detection battery and a computerized forced-choice precognition task. Results showed no evidence of precognition for any belief level group, or either task format. Biofield detection accuracy was significantly above chance expectation for 2 of the 6 modalities tested, and correlated with self reported "energy sensitivity". Belief in ESP was found to be psychologically related to higher levels of belief in other "spiritual experiences", lower levels of cynicism and rigidity, and increased sense of coherence. EEG findings indicated that strong belief and strong skepticism of ESP were associated with increased frontal asymmetry scores, and that moderate degrees of belief were associated with negative frontal asymmetry scores during eyes open baseline recording. Suggestions for future research are provided.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSchwartz, Gary E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3145111en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b47210138en_US
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