Measuring customer online visiting behavior and its impact on purchase decision and profitability

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280623
Title:
Measuring customer online visiting behavior and its impact on purchase decision and profitability
Author:
Lin, Lin
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Effective relationship marketing requires accurate measurement of customer tenure/loyalty and a thorough understanding of its impact on firm performance. Although such studies are plentiful for brick-and-mortar firms, few exist for Internet-based E-tailers. Given the visit-intensive customer behavior online, past methods and theories on customer bases analysis and lifetime-profitability relationship based on purchase events may not apply in an e-commerce context. This dissertation proposes a measurement framework that incorporates customers' online visiting behavior both at the in-session, "micro" level and at the long-term, "macro" level using three metrics: session duration, number of pages viewed and online customer lifetime (OCL). Both stochastic model and neural networks are designed and validated for the measurement of OCL. We then study the relationship between customers' online visiting behavior and firm performance by studying five propositions that relate to whether (1) there exists a positive relationship between OCL and customers' purchase intention, (2) customer who spends longer time or view more pages in a session is more likely to buy, (3) customer with longer online lifetime contribute more to firm's profit, (4) customer with longer session duration and more page viewed is more profitable and (5) product type has an impact on the lifetime-purchase and lifetime-profitability relationship.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Business Administration, Marketing.; Business Administration, Management.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Management Information Systems
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sheng, Olivia R. Liu

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleMeasuring customer online visiting behavior and its impact on purchase decision and profitabilityen_US
dc.creatorLin, Linen_US
dc.contributor.authorLin, Linen_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractEffective relationship marketing requires accurate measurement of customer tenure/loyalty and a thorough understanding of its impact on firm performance. Although such studies are plentiful for brick-and-mortar firms, few exist for Internet-based E-tailers. Given the visit-intensive customer behavior online, past methods and theories on customer bases analysis and lifetime-profitability relationship based on purchase events may not apply in an e-commerce context. This dissertation proposes a measurement framework that incorporates customers' online visiting behavior both at the in-session, "micro" level and at the long-term, "macro" level using three metrics: session duration, number of pages viewed and online customer lifetime (OCL). Both stochastic model and neural networks are designed and validated for the measurement of OCL. We then study the relationship between customers' online visiting behavior and firm performance by studying five propositions that relate to whether (1) there exists a positive relationship between OCL and customers' purchase intention, (2) customer who spends longer time or view more pages in a session is more likely to buy, (3) customer with longer online lifetime contribute more to firm's profit, (4) customer with longer session duration and more page viewed is more profitable and (5) product type has an impact on the lifetime-purchase and lifetime-profitability relationship.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBusiness Administration, Marketing.en_US
dc.subjectBusiness Administration, Management.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineManagement Information Systemsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSheng, Olivia R. Liuen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3145090en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b47210497en_US
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