Dual relationships in the practice of school psychology: A study of ethical beliefs

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280618
Title:
Dual relationships in the practice of school psychology: A study of ethical beliefs
Author:
Katz, Melissa Dawn
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of the present study was to determine the various demographic characteristics of school psychologists and their respective ratings of the frequency of ethical dilemmas they encounter involving dual relationships, and to determine what types of dual relationships are most frequently reported in occurrence. In addition, the present study evaluated the ratings of school psychologists regarding the types of dual relationships that they encounter in the schools and to determine the level at which they rate these situations as ethically troublesome. Two thousand randomly selected members of the National Association of School Psychologists were sent surveys regarding ethical beliefs and practices. 1,000 were sent Form A, which consisted of demographic questions, and a series of multiple relationship situations, on which they were asked to give an ethical rating. 1,000 were sent Form B, which consisted of demographic questions, and a series of multiple relationship situations, on which they were asked to report the occurrences of these situations in their practices. A response percentage of 29.9% (N = 299) was achieved for Form A, and 37.7% (N = 377) for Form B. Significant differences were found between respondents grouped by gender and degree for Ethical Rating Scores. Females were more ethically conservative, rating more items as "never ethical" than males. In addition, practitioners with Master's degrees rated items as more ethically conservative than those with Specialist's degrees. Significant differences were also found between practitioners grouped by school setting for Total Occurrences Scores. Practitioners from rural areas reported that these situations occurred more often than practitioners in other settings.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Educational Psychology.; Psychology, Clinical.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Special Education, Rehabilitation and School Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Morris, Richard

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleDual relationships in the practice of school psychology: A study of ethical beliefsen_US
dc.creatorKatz, Melissa Dawnen_US
dc.contributor.authorKatz, Melissa Dawnen_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of the present study was to determine the various demographic characteristics of school psychologists and their respective ratings of the frequency of ethical dilemmas they encounter involving dual relationships, and to determine what types of dual relationships are most frequently reported in occurrence. In addition, the present study evaluated the ratings of school psychologists regarding the types of dual relationships that they encounter in the schools and to determine the level at which they rate these situations as ethically troublesome. Two thousand randomly selected members of the National Association of School Psychologists were sent surveys regarding ethical beliefs and practices. 1,000 were sent Form A, which consisted of demographic questions, and a series of multiple relationship situations, on which they were asked to give an ethical rating. 1,000 were sent Form B, which consisted of demographic questions, and a series of multiple relationship situations, on which they were asked to report the occurrences of these situations in their practices. A response percentage of 29.9% (N = 299) was achieved for Form A, and 37.7% (N = 377) for Form B. Significant differences were found between respondents grouped by gender and degree for Ethical Rating Scores. Females were more ethically conservative, rating more items as "never ethical" than males. In addition, practitioners with Master's degrees rated items as more ethically conservative than those with Specialist's degrees. Significant differences were also found between practitioners grouped by school setting for Total Occurrences Scores. Practitioners from rural areas reported that these situations occurred more often than practitioners in other settings.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Educational Psychology.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education, Rehabilitation and School Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMorris, Richarden_US
dc.identifier.proquest3145082en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b47212718en_US
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