Non-verbal intelligence and Native-American Navajo children: A comparison between the CTONI and the WISC-III

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280609
Title:
Non-verbal intelligence and Native-American Navajo children: A comparison between the CTONI and the WISC-III
Author:
Wiseley, Mark Christopher
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study investigated the validity of the Comprehensive Test of Nonverbal Intelligence (CTONI) as a measure of intelligence for use with Native-American learning disabled students. Forty boys and ten girls between the ages of 7 and 16 and who are Native-American Navajo students with a learning disability in reading and/or mathematics participated in this study. Each participant was administered the CTONI, the WISC-III, and the WIAT. The results from this study indicated that the CTONI exhibited less variability among its composite IQ scores than the WISC-III. The CTONI and the WISC-III Full-scale IQ, Verbal IQ and Performance IQ correlate moderately. The CTONI and WISC-III are significantly predictive of reading achievement but account for less than 11% of the common variance. Yet, the CTONI and the WISC-III are moderately correlated with mathematics achievement. Factor Analytic Results suggest that the factorial structures of the CTONI and the WISC-III for this sample of Native-American students are consistent with the factorial structures proposed by the respective test authors. The CTONI appears to be a valid measure of intelligence for use with Native American populations. The implications of the findings of the CTONI with Native-American populations are discussed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Educational Psychology.; Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.; Psychology, Psychometrics.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Educational Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Mishra, Shitala P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleNon-verbal intelligence and Native-American Navajo children: A comparison between the CTONI and the WISC-IIIen_US
dc.creatorWiseley, Mark Christopheren_US
dc.contributor.authorWiseley, Mark Christopheren_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the validity of the Comprehensive Test of Nonverbal Intelligence (CTONI) as a measure of intelligence for use with Native-American learning disabled students. Forty boys and ten girls between the ages of 7 and 16 and who are Native-American Navajo students with a learning disability in reading and/or mathematics participated in this study. Each participant was administered the CTONI, the WISC-III, and the WIAT. The results from this study indicated that the CTONI exhibited less variability among its composite IQ scores than the WISC-III. The CTONI and the WISC-III Full-scale IQ, Verbal IQ and Performance IQ correlate moderately. The CTONI and WISC-III are significantly predictive of reading achievement but account for less than 11% of the common variance. Yet, the CTONI and the WISC-III are moderately correlated with mathematics achievement. Factor Analytic Results suggest that the factorial structures of the CTONI and the WISC-III for this sample of Native-American students are consistent with the factorial structures proposed by the respective test authors. The CTONI appears to be a valid measure of intelligence for use with Native American populations. The implications of the findings of the CTONI with Native-American populations are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Educational Psychology.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Psychometrics.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMishra, Shitala P.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3016447en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41885600en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.