Inkjet printing for fabrication of organic photonics and electronics

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280578
Title:
Inkjet printing for fabrication of organic photonics and electronics
Author:
Yoshioka, Yuka
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) are traditionally patterned either through vacuum deposition masks or by UV lithographs. However, such patterning routes are relatively expensive, time consuming, and geometry limited. On the other hand, developments in the use of inkjet printing as a tool to pattern a given electrode promise a low cost, maskless, and non-contact approach to generate a myriad of patterns. In this dissertation, I will present our exploratory works in ink jet printing techniques, to pattern conductive polymers for use as electrodes with predefined shapes and controlled conductivity. Our works have been extended to explore printing with multiple inks, which mix and/or react with each other, for the use in making artificial muscles and for the developments of inkjet combinatorial techniques. Many factors including surface tension of the printed solution, substrate surface properties, and drying conditions have a direct effect on the final quality and performance of the organic based devices. Issues related to device fabrication on flexible substrates will be discussed and the results of tested devices are shown.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Engineering, Materials Science.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Materials Science and Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Jabbour, Ghassan E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleInkjet printing for fabrication of organic photonics and electronicsen_US
dc.creatorYoshioka, Yukaen_US
dc.contributor.authorYoshioka, Yukaen_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOrganic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) are traditionally patterned either through vacuum deposition masks or by UV lithographs. However, such patterning routes are relatively expensive, time consuming, and geometry limited. On the other hand, developments in the use of inkjet printing as a tool to pattern a given electrode promise a low cost, maskless, and non-contact approach to generate a myriad of patterns. In this dissertation, I will present our exploratory works in ink jet printing techniques, to pattern conductive polymers for use as electrodes with predefined shapes and controlled conductivity. Our works have been extended to explore printing with multiple inks, which mix and/or react with each other, for the use in making artificial muscles and for the developments of inkjet combinatorial techniques. Many factors including surface tension of the printed solution, substrate surface properties, and drying conditions have a direct effect on the final quality and performance of the organic based devices. Issues related to device fabrication on flexible substrates will be discussed and the results of tested devices are shown.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Materials Science.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMaterials Science and Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorJabbour, Ghassan E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3132274en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b46707992en_US
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