Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280575
Title:
Radical rationality: The logic of extreme environmental rhetoric
Author:
Maher, Robert Joseph Daniel
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study examines the logic of extreme contemporary North American environmental rhetoric from the perspective of a normative pragmatic approach to argumentation. As such, explicit normative standards for reasonable deliberative discourse serve as the epistemic grounds for a critical evaluation of a type of argumentation that is frequently relied upon by key members of extremely competitive interest groups during actual contemporary environmental policy disputes. The analysis reveals that the inferential framework and interpretive assumptions inherent in radical environmental arguments are embedded in specifiable tapestries of symbolic communication that are without grounds in absolute truth. Nonetheless, these predominantly narrative tapestries address what many people believe to be their proper role and place in the universe and are frequently implicated in chains of social and cognitive consequences that have significant bearing on American environmental policy deliberation and decision making processes. In this respect, it is argued that radical environmental argumentation is not fundamentally different than mainstream environmental argumentation. It is also argued that radical environmental arguments are as deserving of policy makers' time and consideration as any environmental argument, especially during environmental policy deliberation and decision making processes.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Speech Communication.; Language, Rhetoric and Composition.; Environmental Sciences.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Communication
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Jacobs, Scott C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleRadical rationality: The logic of extreme environmental rhetoricen_US
dc.creatorMaher, Robert Joseph Danielen_US
dc.contributor.authorMaher, Robert Joseph Danielen_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study examines the logic of extreme contemporary North American environmental rhetoric from the perspective of a normative pragmatic approach to argumentation. As such, explicit normative standards for reasonable deliberative discourse serve as the epistemic grounds for a critical evaluation of a type of argumentation that is frequently relied upon by key members of extremely competitive interest groups during actual contemporary environmental policy disputes. The analysis reveals that the inferential framework and interpretive assumptions inherent in radical environmental arguments are embedded in specifiable tapestries of symbolic communication that are without grounds in absolute truth. Nonetheless, these predominantly narrative tapestries address what many people believe to be their proper role and place in the universe and are frequently implicated in chains of social and cognitive consequences that have significant bearing on American environmental policy deliberation and decision making processes. In this respect, it is argued that radical environmental argumentation is not fundamentally different than mainstream environmental argumentation. It is also argued that radical environmental arguments are as deserving of policy makers' time and consideration as any environmental argument, especially during environmental policy deliberation and decision making processes.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSpeech Communication.en_US
dc.subjectLanguage, Rhetoric and Composition.en_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciences.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorJacobs, Scott C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3002516en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41394033en_US
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