The diffusion of high-technology innovations to new organizational users: A network perspective

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280557
Title:
The diffusion of high-technology innovations to new organizational users: A network perspective
Author:
Leung, Chung Yee Ada
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Using a network perspective, this dissertation investigates the diffusion of high-technology innovations to organizational users. The particular innovation of interest is satellite remotely sensed data, and the diffusion phenomena occur among geospatial professionals who work in local government agencies. I utilize multiple methods in the dissertation. Essay 1 looks at the impacts of structural bases of social influences on diffusion. In Essays 2 and 3, I focus the investigation on advocates, the adopters who share their adoption experiences with their professional peers. While Essay 2 investigates the structural consequences at an individual level, Essay 3 provides an overarching framework of diffusion consequences at individual, organizational and population levels. This project makes theoretical contributions to marketing, consumer behavior and management. For marketing, I investigate the origins of imitation effects of diffusion by examining the social networks of the adopters and potential adopters. For consumer behavior, I examine the underlying logic for aspiring professionals to focus their work on spreading knowledge of innovation, and I demonstrate that innovation diffusion is a means to compete for high-status positions in the professional field. For management, I look at the reciprocal relationships between innovation diffusion and career development of adopters, and show that personnel mobility is crucial for diffusion in the organizations and population. This dissertation demonstrates how news and interpretations of innovations are filtered through consumers' networks. Since users are connected with social networks, the adoption of innovation by one individual user has ramifications among those with whom he or she is connected. Similarly, adopting organizations are interconnected through their employees' participation in various interorganizational projects and professional associations. Therefore, the adoption in one organization encourages similar processes to occur in other connected organizations. By examining the nature of contacts among adopters and potential adopters, marketers can anticipate the market trajectory and hence market growth. The knowledge generated from this dissertation should sensitize public policy makers about the countervailing nature of diffusion consequences. Adopting organizations may or may not gain in technological sophistication after adoption because their advocating employees become desirable in the field and are likely to be sought out by other organizations.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Business Administration, Marketing.; Business Administration, Management.; Sociology, Social Structure and Development.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Business Administration
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Wallendorf, Melanie

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe diffusion of high-technology innovations to new organizational users: A network perspectiveen_US
dc.creatorLeung, Chung Yee Adaen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Chung Yee Adaen_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractUsing a network perspective, this dissertation investigates the diffusion of high-technology innovations to organizational users. The particular innovation of interest is satellite remotely sensed data, and the diffusion phenomena occur among geospatial professionals who work in local government agencies. I utilize multiple methods in the dissertation. Essay 1 looks at the impacts of structural bases of social influences on diffusion. In Essays 2 and 3, I focus the investigation on advocates, the adopters who share their adoption experiences with their professional peers. While Essay 2 investigates the structural consequences at an individual level, Essay 3 provides an overarching framework of diffusion consequences at individual, organizational and population levels. This project makes theoretical contributions to marketing, consumer behavior and management. For marketing, I investigate the origins of imitation effects of diffusion by examining the social networks of the adopters and potential adopters. For consumer behavior, I examine the underlying logic for aspiring professionals to focus their work on spreading knowledge of innovation, and I demonstrate that innovation diffusion is a means to compete for high-status positions in the professional field. For management, I look at the reciprocal relationships between innovation diffusion and career development of adopters, and show that personnel mobility is crucial for diffusion in the organizations and population. This dissertation demonstrates how news and interpretations of innovations are filtered through consumers' networks. Since users are connected with social networks, the adoption of innovation by one individual user has ramifications among those with whom he or she is connected. Similarly, adopting organizations are interconnected through their employees' participation in various interorganizational projects and professional associations. Therefore, the adoption in one organization encourages similar processes to occur in other connected organizations. By examining the nature of contacts among adopters and potential adopters, marketers can anticipate the market trajectory and hence market growth. The knowledge generated from this dissertation should sensitize public policy makers about the countervailing nature of diffusion consequences. Adopting organizations may or may not gain in technological sophistication after adoption because their advocating employees become desirable in the field and are likely to be sought out by other organizations.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBusiness Administration, Marketing.en_US
dc.subjectBusiness Administration, Management.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Social Structure and Development.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBusiness Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWallendorf, Melanieen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3132237en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b46708376en_US
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