Academic support factors affecting the graduation rates of student athletes

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280543
Title:
Academic support factors affecting the graduation rates of student athletes
Author:
Cohn, David McDougal
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study examined the components of academic support that influenced the graduation rates of college football players. The study included Research I and Land Grant institutions that participated in NCAA Division I athletics and met NCAA eligibility standards for student athletes. A total of 27 institutions were identified. Among these schools, there were no significant differences in the average SAT scores. The 27 schools were ranked in the order of their average graduation rates for football players for 1996, 1997, and 1998. The top three, middle three, and bottom three institutions were then chosen for comparison and analysis. Information about each institution's Academic Support Program was gathered through the use of a questionnaire and follow-up interviews. All nine of the surveyed institutions had similar components of academic support. The top three programs differed from the others in two ways: (1) Key leaders (Athletic Director, Academic Program Director, coaches, and faculty) established academic success as a priority and used positive consequences for success and negative consequences for failure to perform and (2) student athletes were served through the academic services, programs, and systems the university already provided to assist all students. Ironically, the three institutions with the largest budgets and largest number of academic staff had the lowest graduation rates. Implications concentrate on potential changes in institutional policies. This study has five implications for the NCAA, university Presidents, and Athletic Directors.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Physical.; Education, Special.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Special Edcuation, Rehabilitation, and School Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Chalfant, James C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAcademic support factors affecting the graduation rates of student athletesen_US
dc.creatorCohn, David McDougalen_US
dc.contributor.authorCohn, David McDougalen_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the components of academic support that influenced the graduation rates of college football players. The study included Research I and Land Grant institutions that participated in NCAA Division I athletics and met NCAA eligibility standards for student athletes. A total of 27 institutions were identified. Among these schools, there were no significant differences in the average SAT scores. The 27 schools were ranked in the order of their average graduation rates for football players for 1996, 1997, and 1998. The top three, middle three, and bottom three institutions were then chosen for comparison and analysis. Information about each institution's Academic Support Program was gathered through the use of a questionnaire and follow-up interviews. All nine of the surveyed institutions had similar components of academic support. The top three programs differed from the others in two ways: (1) Key leaders (Athletic Director, Academic Program Director, coaches, and faculty) established academic success as a priority and used positive consequences for success and negative consequences for failure to perform and (2) student athletes were served through the academic services, programs, and systems the university already provided to assist all students. Ironically, the three institutions with the largest budgets and largest number of academic staff had the lowest graduation rates. Implications concentrate on potential changes in institutional policies. This study has five implications for the NCAA, university Presidents, and Athletic Directors.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Physical.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Special.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Edcuation, Rehabilitation, and School Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorChalfant, James C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3132207en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b46711302en_US
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