Nongovernmental organizations and the state in the developing world

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280533
Title:
Nongovernmental organizations and the state in the developing world
Author:
Roberts, Wade Travis
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation explores the impact of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and state-civil society relations on national development. In doing so, it advances the development literature by keeping pace with the institutional changes brought about by decades of neoliberal policy. The NGO sector has expanded rapidly in recent years, becoming a major component of developing countries' civil societies and key actors in the development process at all levels, from the local to the global. NGOs now participate in everything from service delivery to policy design and advocacy. States, on the other hand, have seen aspects of their capacity weakened and their involvement in development transformed. At the same time, they are exposed to new demands and pressures by both domestic and international groups, including the NGO sector. Drawing on the insights of state, world society, and social capital theories, this dissertation addresses this new institutional reality of national development by examining the relationship between the state and NGO sector. The dissertation proceeds in two parts. Part I uses cross-national quantitative methods to assess the effect of global society embeddedness on national economic and social development, particularly through the promotion of more responsive and effective governance. As such, the analyses expand on and contribute empirically to the literature on the developmental state. Part II focuses on the state-NGO sector relationship more directly, using Qualitative Comparative Analysis and case study methods to identify types of state-civil society regimes, as well as the conditions associated with complementary state-NGO sector relations.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Sociology, Social Structure and Development.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Sociology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ragin, Charles C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleNongovernmental organizations and the state in the developing worlden_US
dc.creatorRoberts, Wade Travisen_US
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Wade Travisen_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation explores the impact of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and state-civil society relations on national development. In doing so, it advances the development literature by keeping pace with the institutional changes brought about by decades of neoliberal policy. The NGO sector has expanded rapidly in recent years, becoming a major component of developing countries' civil societies and key actors in the development process at all levels, from the local to the global. NGOs now participate in everything from service delivery to policy design and advocacy. States, on the other hand, have seen aspects of their capacity weakened and their involvement in development transformed. At the same time, they are exposed to new demands and pressures by both domestic and international groups, including the NGO sector. Drawing on the insights of state, world society, and social capital theories, this dissertation addresses this new institutional reality of national development by examining the relationship between the state and NGO sector. The dissertation proceeds in two parts. Part I uses cross-national quantitative methods to assess the effect of global society embeddedness on national economic and social development, particularly through the promotion of more responsive and effective governance. As such, the analyses expand on and contribute empirically to the literature on the developmental state. Part II focuses on the state-NGO sector relationship more directly, using Qualitative Comparative Analysis and case study methods to identify types of state-civil society regimes, as well as the conditions associated with complementary state-NGO sector relations.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Social Structure and Development.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRagin, Charles C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3131636en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b46709459en_US
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