Examining technology usability and acceptance in digital government: A case study in law enforcement

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280521
Title:
Examining technology usability and acceptance in digital government: A case study in law enforcement
Author:
Lin, Chienting
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Increasingly, government agencies are facing the challenge of effective implementation of information technologies that are critical to their digital government programs and initiatives. This dissertation reports two user-centric evaluation studies of COPLINK, a criminal knowledge management system that supports and enhances law enforcement officers' crime-fighting activities. Specifically, these aforementioned evaluations concentrated on system usability and user acceptance in a law enforcement setting. The chapters of this dissertation describe the study design, highlight the analysis results, and discuss their implications for digital government research and practices. Overall, the models used in this study showed a reasonably good fit with officers' usability and acceptance assessments and exhibited satisfactory explanatory power. The analysis also showed that individuals included in the current study exhibited important characteristics common to individual professionals. Compared to end-users and knowledge workers in business settings, law enforcement officers appear to be pragmatic in their technology acceptance assessments, concentrating more on the usefulness of a technology than on its ease of use. Participating officers also attached limited weight to the suggestions or opinions of significant referents. Findings from this study should provide valuable insights to digital government systems evaluation and, at the same time, shed light on how government agencies can design management interventions to foster technology acceptance and use.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Business Administration, Management.; Sociology, Criminology and Penology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Business Administration
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Chen, Hsinchun

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleExamining technology usability and acceptance in digital government: A case study in law enforcementen_US
dc.creatorLin, Chientingen_US
dc.contributor.authorLin, Chientingen_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIncreasingly, government agencies are facing the challenge of effective implementation of information technologies that are critical to their digital government programs and initiatives. This dissertation reports two user-centric evaluation studies of COPLINK, a criminal knowledge management system that supports and enhances law enforcement officers' crime-fighting activities. Specifically, these aforementioned evaluations concentrated on system usability and user acceptance in a law enforcement setting. The chapters of this dissertation describe the study design, highlight the analysis results, and discuss their implications for digital government research and practices. Overall, the models used in this study showed a reasonably good fit with officers' usability and acceptance assessments and exhibited satisfactory explanatory power. The analysis also showed that individuals included in the current study exhibited important characteristics common to individual professionals. Compared to end-users and knowledge workers in business settings, law enforcement officers appear to be pragmatic in their technology acceptance assessments, concentrating more on the usefulness of a technology than on its ease of use. Participating officers also attached limited weight to the suggestions or opinions of significant referents. Findings from this study should provide valuable insights to digital government systems evaluation and, at the same time, shed light on how government agencies can design management interventions to foster technology acceptance and use.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBusiness Administration, Management.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Criminology and Penology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBusiness Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorChen, Hsinchunen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3131616en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b46708285en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.