Wave-current interactions in coastal waters and their application to shore-connected bars

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280520
Title:
Wave-current interactions in coastal waters and their application to shore-connected bars
Author:
Lane, Emily M.
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A multi-scale asymptotic theory is derived for the evolution and interaction of currents and surface gravity waves in water of finite depth, under conditions typical of coastal shelf waters outside the surf zone. The theory provides a practical and useful model with which wave-current coupling may be explored without the necessity of resolving features of the flow on space and time scales of the primary gravity-wave oscillations. The essential nature of the dynamical interaction is currents modulating the slowly evolving phase of the wave field and waves providing both phase-averaged forcing of long, infra-gravity waves and wave-averaged vortex forces for the low-frequency current and sea-level evolution equations. Analogous relations are derived for material tracers and density stratification that include phase-averaged, Stokes-drift advection, including by a vertical Stokes pseudo-velocity that is the incompressible companion to the horizontal Stokes velocity. This theory is used to study the effect of waves on the evolution of large-scale erodible beds. In particular, the formation of certain up-current rotated, shore-connected bars is investigated. It is hypothesized that these bars form due to an instability of the bottom topography in the presence of a storm driven flow. This hypothesis is reviewed in the light of the presence of both waves and currents. It is shown that waves can significantly affect the instability. The effects of different wave parameters are investigated. Steady flow and boundary condition assumptions are also examined.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Mathematics.; Physical Oceanography.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Applied Mathematics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Restrepo, Juan M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleWave-current interactions in coastal waters and their application to shore-connected barsen_US
dc.creatorLane, Emily M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLane, Emily M.en_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA multi-scale asymptotic theory is derived for the evolution and interaction of currents and surface gravity waves in water of finite depth, under conditions typical of coastal shelf waters outside the surf zone. The theory provides a practical and useful model with which wave-current coupling may be explored without the necessity of resolving features of the flow on space and time scales of the primary gravity-wave oscillations. The essential nature of the dynamical interaction is currents modulating the slowly evolving phase of the wave field and waves providing both phase-averaged forcing of long, infra-gravity waves and wave-averaged vortex forces for the low-frequency current and sea-level evolution equations. Analogous relations are derived for material tracers and density stratification that include phase-averaged, Stokes-drift advection, including by a vertical Stokes pseudo-velocity that is the incompressible companion to the horizontal Stokes velocity. This theory is used to study the effect of waves on the evolution of large-scale erodible beds. In particular, the formation of certain up-current rotated, shore-connected bars is investigated. It is hypothesized that these bars form due to an instability of the bottom topography in the presence of a storm driven flow. This hypothesis is reviewed in the light of the presence of both waves and currents. It is shown that waves can significantly affect the instability. The effects of different wave parameters are investigated. Steady flow and boundary condition assumptions are also examined.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectMathematics.en_US
dc.subjectPhysical Oceanography.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineApplied Mathematicsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRestrepo, Juan M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3131613en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b46708327en_US
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