Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280516
Title:
Raster-based analysis and visualization of hydrologic time-series
Author:
Koehler, Richard Bruce
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Annual, seasonal, and daily discharge patterns determine many of the physical and biological properties of a stream. Natural short- and long-term variation of streamflow is part of the normal processes of a river or stream whereas artificial short- and long-term fluctuations can disrupt the natural processes of a river. It is critical to recognize and identify such artificial fluctuations and disturbances to have a more complete understanding of river systems. This understanding can be used to modify current management efforts to achieve more natural flow regimes. A new procedure using dual-timescale graphs is presented to visualize streamflow characteristics and to measure temporal change objectively. Theoretical development, procedural guidelines, and interpretation of results are included in the development of this new approach. The raster-based method is applied to two large river systems in the western United States. Data from twelve U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow stations within the middle and upper Snake River Basin and upper Colorado River Basin were analyzed using a dual-timescale raster-grid to identify flow signatures and disturbances. Patch-analysis and pattern quantification techniques used in landscape ecology were applied to dual-timescale raster-based hydrographs. Both river basins included gaging stations where minimal human-caused disturbances have taken place within the respective watershed. These stations function as control sites for interpretation of grid-correlograms and patch-analysis results.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Hydrology.; Environmental Sciences.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Guertin, D. Phillip

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleRaster-based analysis and visualization of hydrologic time-seriesen_US
dc.creatorKoehler, Richard Bruceen_US
dc.contributor.authorKoehler, Richard Bruceen_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAnnual, seasonal, and daily discharge patterns determine many of the physical and biological properties of a stream. Natural short- and long-term variation of streamflow is part of the normal processes of a river or stream whereas artificial short- and long-term fluctuations can disrupt the natural processes of a river. It is critical to recognize and identify such artificial fluctuations and disturbances to have a more complete understanding of river systems. This understanding can be used to modify current management efforts to achieve more natural flow regimes. A new procedure using dual-timescale graphs is presented to visualize streamflow characteristics and to measure temporal change objectively. Theoretical development, procedural guidelines, and interpretation of results are included in the development of this new approach. The raster-based method is applied to two large river systems in the western United States. Data from twelve U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow stations within the middle and upper Snake River Basin and upper Colorado River Basin were analyzed using a dual-timescale raster-grid to identify flow signatures and disturbances. Patch-analysis and pattern quantification techniques used in landscape ecology were applied to dual-timescale raster-based hydrographs. Both river basins included gaging stations where minimal human-caused disturbances have taken place within the respective watershed. These stations function as control sites for interpretation of grid-correlograms and patch-analysis results.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHydrology.en_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciences.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGuertin, D. Phillipen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3131610en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b4670906xen_US
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