A simulation-based software development methodology for distributed real-time systems

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280514
Title:
A simulation-based software development methodology for distributed real-time systems
Author:
Hu, Xiaolin
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Powered by the rapid advance of computer, network, and sensor/actuator technologies, distributed real-time systems that continually and autonomously control and react to the environment have been widely used. The combination of temporal requirements, concurrent environmental entities, and high reliability requirements, together with distributed processing make the software to control these systems extremely hard to design and difficult to verify. In this work, we developed a simulation-based software development methodology to manage the complexity of distributed real-time software. This methodology, based on discrete event system specification (DEVS), overcomes the "incoherence problem" between different design stages by emphasizing "model continuity" through the development process. Specifically, techniques have been developed so that the same control models that are designed can be tested and analyzed by simulation methods and then easily deployed to the distributed target system for execution. To improve the traditional software testing process where real-time embedded software needs to be hooked up with real sensor/actuators and placed in a physical environment for meaningful test and analysis, we developed a virtual test environment that allows software to be effectively tested and analyzed in a virtual environment, using virtual sensor/actuators. Within this environment, stepwise simulation methods have been developed so that different aspects, such as logic and temporal behaviors, of a real-time system can be tested and analyzed incrementally. Based on this methodology, a simulation and testing environment for distributed autonomous robotic systems is developed. This environment has successfully supported the development and investigation of several distributed autonomous robotic systems. One of them is a "dynamic team formation" system in which mobile robots search for each other, and then form a team dynamically through self-organization. Another system is a scalable robot convoy system in which robots convoy and maintain a line formation in a coordinated way.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Engineering, Electronics and Electrical.; Computer Science.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Electrical and Computer Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Zeigler, Bernard P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleA simulation-based software development methodology for distributed real-time systemsen_US
dc.creatorHu, Xiaolinen_US
dc.contributor.authorHu, Xiaolinen_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPowered by the rapid advance of computer, network, and sensor/actuator technologies, distributed real-time systems that continually and autonomously control and react to the environment have been widely used. The combination of temporal requirements, concurrent environmental entities, and high reliability requirements, together with distributed processing make the software to control these systems extremely hard to design and difficult to verify. In this work, we developed a simulation-based software development methodology to manage the complexity of distributed real-time software. This methodology, based on discrete event system specification (DEVS), overcomes the "incoherence problem" between different design stages by emphasizing "model continuity" through the development process. Specifically, techniques have been developed so that the same control models that are designed can be tested and analyzed by simulation methods and then easily deployed to the distributed target system for execution. To improve the traditional software testing process where real-time embedded software needs to be hooked up with real sensor/actuators and placed in a physical environment for meaningful test and analysis, we developed a virtual test environment that allows software to be effectively tested and analyzed in a virtual environment, using virtual sensor/actuators. Within this environment, stepwise simulation methods have been developed so that different aspects, such as logic and temporal behaviors, of a real-time system can be tested and analyzed incrementally. Based on this methodology, a simulation and testing environment for distributed autonomous robotic systems is developed. This environment has successfully supported the development and investigation of several distributed autonomous robotic systems. One of them is a "dynamic team formation" system in which mobile robots search for each other, and then form a team dynamically through self-organization. Another system is a scalable robot convoy system in which robots convoy and maintain a line formation in a coordinated way.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Electronics and Electrical.en_US
dc.subjectComputer Science.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineElectrical and Computer Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorZeigler, Bernard P.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3131605en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b4670856xen_US
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