Ground based remote sensing for irrigation management in precision agriculture

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280497
Title:
Ground based remote sensing for irrigation management in precision agriculture
Author:
Colaizzi, Paul Dominic
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The relationship between remotely sensed canopy temperature and soil moisture was studied. The objectives were to relate two remotely sensed canopy temperature-based indices, the Crop Water Stress Index (CWSI) and the Water Deficit Index (WDI), to soil moisture through the water stress coefficient, to estimate soil moisture depletion with the CWSI and the WDI, and to develop a remote sensing system aboard a linear move irrigation system that would provide field images of the WDI at one-meter spatial resolution. Studies were conducted in Maricopa, Arizona during the 1998 and 1999 seasons with cotton (Gossypium hirsutum, Delta Pine 90b). In 1998, the field was surface irrigated (low frequency irrigation), and the CWSI was calculated from canopy temperature measurements using stationary infrared thermometers. In 1999, the field was irrigated with a linear move system (high frequency irrigation), and the WDI was calculated using measurements made by the on board remote sensing system. Both the CWSI and the WDI were correlated to soil moisture through the water stress coefficient. Soil moisture depletion could be estimated using the CWSI under low frequency irrigation, but could not be estimated using the WDI under high frequency irrigation. These differences were attributed to the range of soil moisture resulting from infrequent surface irrigation vs. frequent irrigation using the linear move. High spatial resolution images of the WDI could nonetheless monitor water stress throughout the field from partial to full canopy cover, which demonstrated that ground-based remote sensing is feasible for irrigation management in precision agriculture. This application of remote sensing provides an opportunity to improve water use efficiency.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Agriculture, Agronomy.; Engineering, Agricultural.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Choi, Christopher Y.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleGround based remote sensing for irrigation management in precision agricultureen_US
dc.creatorColaizzi, Paul Dominicen_US
dc.contributor.authorColaizzi, Paul Dominicen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe relationship between remotely sensed canopy temperature and soil moisture was studied. The objectives were to relate two remotely sensed canopy temperature-based indices, the Crop Water Stress Index (CWSI) and the Water Deficit Index (WDI), to soil moisture through the water stress coefficient, to estimate soil moisture depletion with the CWSI and the WDI, and to develop a remote sensing system aboard a linear move irrigation system that would provide field images of the WDI at one-meter spatial resolution. Studies were conducted in Maricopa, Arizona during the 1998 and 1999 seasons with cotton (Gossypium hirsutum, Delta Pine 90b). In 1998, the field was surface irrigated (low frequency irrigation), and the CWSI was calculated from canopy temperature measurements using stationary infrared thermometers. In 1999, the field was irrigated with a linear move system (high frequency irrigation), and the WDI was calculated using measurements made by the on board remote sensing system. Both the CWSI and the WDI were correlated to soil moisture through the water stress coefficient. Soil moisture depletion could be estimated using the CWSI under low frequency irrigation, but could not be estimated using the WDI under high frequency irrigation. These differences were attributed to the range of soil moisture resulting from infrequent surface irrigation vs. frequent irrigation using the linear move. High spatial resolution images of the WDI could nonetheless monitor water stress throughout the field from partial to full canopy cover, which demonstrated that ground-based remote sensing is feasible for irrigation management in precision agriculture. This application of remote sensing provides an opportunity to improve water use efficiency.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Agronomy.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Agricultural.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural and Biosystems Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorChoi, Christopher Y.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3010258en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41711762en_US
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