Autonomic and emotion regulation in bereavement: A longitudinal study

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280491
Title:
Autonomic and emotion regulation in bereavement: A longitudinal study
Author:
O'Connor, Mary-Frances
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Recent investigations have shown little evidence of differential improvement of written disclosure for bereaved individuals over a control condition. The present study hypothesized that a moderator may interact with disclosure. Vagal tone, as indexed by respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), was proposed to moderate the effect of written disclosure. Vagal tone has been shown as an individual difference in self-regulation in the infant literature, and more recently in adults with depression, anxiety, and daily stressors. The present study investigated thirty-five bereaved participants in a longitudinal design, with participants writing each week for three weeks, a one-week and one-month follow-up. As with previous studies, bereaved participants showed improvement over the two-month period, although no differential improvement was seen in the emotional disclosure group. As hypothesized, however, those participants with the highest RSA benefited most from the written disclosure, while RSA level did not predict outcome for those in the control condition. Future research should investigate if this moderator effect may be present in written disclosure for non-bereaved individuals.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Clinical.; Psychology, Physiological.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kaszniak, Alfred W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAutonomic and emotion regulation in bereavement: A longitudinal studyen_US
dc.creatorO'Connor, Mary-Francesen_US
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Mary-Francesen_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractRecent investigations have shown little evidence of differential improvement of written disclosure for bereaved individuals over a control condition. The present study hypothesized that a moderator may interact with disclosure. Vagal tone, as indexed by respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), was proposed to moderate the effect of written disclosure. Vagal tone has been shown as an individual difference in self-regulation in the infant literature, and more recently in adults with depression, anxiety, and daily stressors. The present study investigated thirty-five bereaved participants in a longitudinal design, with participants writing each week for three weeks, a one-week and one-month follow-up. As with previous studies, bereaved participants showed improvement over the two-month period, although no differential improvement was seen in the emotional disclosure group. As hypothesized, however, those participants with the highest RSA benefited most from the written disclosure, while RSA level did not predict outcome for those in the control condition. Future research should investigate if this moderator effect may be present in written disclosure for non-bereaved individuals.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Physiological.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKaszniak, Alfred W.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3119972en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b45645528en_US
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