AIDS and identity construction: The use of narratives of self-transformation among clients of AIDS service organizations

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280477
Title:
AIDS and identity construction: The use of narratives of self-transformation among clients of AIDS service organizations
Author:
Guarino, Honoria M.
Issue Date:
2003
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The central objective of this paper is to investigate how the experience of living with HIV/AIDS in the U.S. impacts an individual's sense of identity and to what extent this identity is influenced by the institutional ideologies of AIDS service organizations and the "dominant discourse" of AIDS these organizations help produce. My analysis is based upon three years of participant-observation at Gay Men's Health Crisis (GMHC), a major AIDS service organization in New York City, as well as in-depth semi-structured interviews with 34 HIV positive individuals, all of whom are clients of either GMHC or another AIDS-related service agency in New York. In addition, I juxtapose the interview-derived speech data of HIVers with an examination of various kinds of textual material about AIDS--written texts that constitute what I characterize as a "dominant discourse" of AIDS. As my primary unit of analysis, I examine the narratives of self-transformation articulated by interviewees, stories that are quite literally about identity reconstruction. Through these narratives, HIV positive individuals construct their HIV diagnosis as a significant turning point in their lives, interpreting this event as an opportunity to refashion themselves into "better" people and to begin their lives anew. Narratives of self-transformation function to rehabilitate HIVers' identities since the new identities many interviewees claim to have achieved after their HIV-impelled journeys of self-reinvention are crafted in accordance with the normative model of HIVer identity established in the dominant discourse.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Language, Linguistics.; Anthropology, Cultural.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Philips, Susan U.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAIDS and identity construction: The use of narratives of self-transformation among clients of AIDS service organizationsen_US
dc.creatorGuarino, Honoria M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGuarino, Honoria M.en_US
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe central objective of this paper is to investigate how the experience of living with HIV/AIDS in the U.S. impacts an individual's sense of identity and to what extent this identity is influenced by the institutional ideologies of AIDS service organizations and the "dominant discourse" of AIDS these organizations help produce. My analysis is based upon three years of participant-observation at Gay Men's Health Crisis (GMHC), a major AIDS service organization in New York City, as well as in-depth semi-structured interviews with 34 HIV positive individuals, all of whom are clients of either GMHC or another AIDS-related service agency in New York. In addition, I juxtapose the interview-derived speech data of HIVers with an examination of various kinds of textual material about AIDS--written texts that constitute what I characterize as a "dominant discourse" of AIDS. As my primary unit of analysis, I examine the narratives of self-transformation articulated by interviewees, stories that are quite literally about identity reconstruction. Through these narratives, HIV positive individuals construct their HIV diagnosis as a significant turning point in their lives, interpreting this event as an opportunity to refashion themselves into "better" people and to begin their lives anew. Narratives of self-transformation function to rehabilitate HIVers' identities since the new identities many interviewees claim to have achieved after their HIV-impelled journeys of self-reinvention are crafted in accordance with the normative model of HIVer identity established in the dominant discourse.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectLanguage, Linguistics.en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPhilips, Susan U.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3119950en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b45631839en_US
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